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The Tar Heel Steamboat Company – Part I

26 Apr

NEW STEAMBOAT LINE.

—–

Company Formed To Compete For

Upper Cape Fear Traffic.

—–

A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown.  The stockholders are leading men of that place.  The chief promoter and principal stockholder is Mr. A. E. Martin, of Fayetteville, who will be the general agent.

A line of boats will be operated on the upper Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company, which is now operating four steamers on the river, viz:  City of Fayetteville, Highlander, Hurt and E. A. Hawes.

At a meeting of the directors of the new company in Elizabethtown Wednesday morning it was decided to purchase the steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city.  The sale will be confirmed in Wilmington next Monday and the steamer will be put on a schedule by the new company.  The Tar Heel is a comparatively new boat.  She is 100 feet long, 20 feet wide and is considered the lightest draught boat on the river.  The purchase price has not been made public but we understand the new company got a good trade.  The name of the Wilmington agent for the line has not been announced.

[Wilmington Dispatch – January 22, 1904]


 

New Steamboat Line for the River.

Says the Wilmington Dispatch:

A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown.  The stockholders are leading men of that place.  The chief promoter and principal stockholder is Mr. A. E. Martin, of Fayetteville, who will be the general agent.

A line of boats will be operated on the upper Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company, which is now operating four steamers on the river, viz:  City of Fayetteville, Highlander, Hurt and E. A. Hawes.

At a meeting of the directors of the new company in Elizabethtown Wednesday morning it was decided to purchase the steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city.  The sale will be confirmed in Wilmington next Monday and the steamer will be put on a schedule by the new company.  The Tar Heel is a comparatively new boat.  She is 100 feet long, 20 feet wide and is considered the lightest draught boat on the river.  The purchase price has not been made public but we understand the new company got a good trade.  The name of the Wilmington agent for the line has not been announced.

Says the Wilmington correspondent of the Raleigh Post:

A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown, N. C.  Mr. E. A. Martin, of Fayetteville, is the principal stockholder and general agent.  The company will operate a line of steamers on the Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company.  The new company has purchased the Steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city.  The line will be in operation next week.

It was officially announced that Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, the well known steamboat man, will operate a line of steamers on the Santee and Congaree rivers between Georgetown and Columbia, S. C., a distance of two hundred miles.  This is one of the most important river transportation ventures ever made in the Carolinas.  The new line will open up one of the best farming sections of South Carolina, besides giving Columbia an all water route to New York, using the Clyde Line, which runs to Georgetown.  It will also give a water route from Charleston to Columbia via Georgetown.  The business men of Columbia, feeling that the railroad rates on freight are excessive, started the movement to establish an all water line and have guaranteed Mr. Love a large tonnage.  The new line will be in operation in two weeks.  Steamers from the Cape Fear river fleet will be used on the Georgetown and Columbia line.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, January 28, 1904]


 

—  The river steamer “Tar Heel” has been delivered to the new company at Elizabethtown, which recently purchased the boat.

[?? – January 31, 1904]

 


 

TAR HEEL STEAMBOAT CO.

—–

New Line Between Wilmington and Fayetteville Now in Operation.

The steamer “Tar Heel,” recently purchased by the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, of Elizabethtown, arrived yesterday on its maiden trip under the new management.  Capt. Jeff Bradshaw, the veteran steamboat man, is master of the “Tar Heel” and the wharf at foot of Chesnut street has been engaged by the new company as a landing for the boat.  Mr. S. M. King, of Elizabethtown, will be Wilmington agent for the new boat and will look after its interests at this end of the line.

Mr. E. C. Clark, of Elizabethtown, one of the stockholders of the new company, was here yesterday installing the new agent in his office.

[?? —  February 7, 1904]

 

 

Tar Heel Steamboat Company.

Says the Wilmington Star, of Sunday.

The steamer “Tar Heel,” recently purchased by the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, of Elizabethtown, arrived yesterday on its maiden trip under the new management.  Capt. Jeff Bradshaw, the veteran steamboat man, is master of the “Tar Heel” and the wharf at foot of Chestnut street has been engaged by the new company as a landing for the new boat.  Mr. S. M. King, of Elizabethtown, will be the Wilmington agent for the new boat and will look after its interests at this end of the line.

Mr. E. C. Clark, of Elizabethtown, one of the stockholders of the new company, was here yesterday installing the new agent in his office.

[Fayetteville Observer – Feb. 11, 1904]

 

The New Boat Line.

Says the Elizabethtown correspondent of the Clarkton Express:

The steamer Tar Heel, recently purchased by the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, made its initial trip last Friday, carrying a large freight and several passengers.

The above named company has been incorporated and a board of directors elected as follows: A. E. Martin, J. B. McFadyen, C. W. Lyon, J. O. West and J. S. Williamson. At a meeting of the board of directors the following officers were elected: President, C. W. Lyon; Treasurer, A. E. Martin; Secretary, J. S. Williamson. A. E. Martin is general manager, with offices at Fayetteville, and S. M. King agent at Wilmington.  The boat will leave Fayetteville on Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a. m. and Wilmington on Tuesdays and Fridays at 4 o’clock p. m. The people living along the Cape Fear River are to be congratulated on having competitive lines, which will secure fair treatment and reasonable rates.

[The Fayetteville Observer – February 18, 1904]

 

Stock Certificate No. 47 in the amount of 40 shares @ $10 assigned to S. M. King and signed by President, C. W. Lyon and Secretary, J. Williamson.  The certificate has the embossed company seal in the left corner which shows that the company was incorporated in 1904. (Link to HiRes image.)

Tar Heel Steamboat Co Stock Certificate

Tar Heel Steamboat Co Stock Certificate

Digital copy from the Wanda Campbell Historical Room
of the Bladen County Public Library,
in Elizabethtown, NC.

Sale of Steamer Hurt.

The steamer A. P. Hurt, of the Cape Fear and People’s Steamboat Co. with her tackle, apparel and all other appurtenances, was sold yesterday at auction under receiver’s sale at the wharf of the company, in Wilmington.  Mr. W. J. Meredith having become the purchaser at $2,475 says the Wilmington Star, of Sunday:

The sale was conducted by Hon Jno. D. Bellamy, attorney for Receiver D. McEachern, and the bidders, besides Mr. Meredith, were Col. W. S. Cook and Mr. A. E. Martin, of Fayetteville, and Mr. C. H. Dock, of Wilmington.  The sale is subject to confirmation of the court, under a decree of which, in the case of H. L. Vollers and others against the company, the property was ordered sold.  It is understood that the bid of Mr. Meredith will be raised ten per cent before confirmation, in which event, the steamer will probably be re-sold.

Mr. Meredith said last night that in the purchase of the steamer he was representing a new and entirely independent company, which proposes, if the sale is confirmed, to operate the steamer on the Cape Fear under the same name which she now bears.  It is understood that Mr. A. J. Johnson, of Clear Run, is associated with Mr. Meredith and others in the new company.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, February 16, 1905]

To Rebuild the Steamer Hurt.

The Wilmington Star of Saturday says:

Mr. W. J. Meredith, who purchased the steamer A. P. Hurt at receiver’s sale recently, announces that he has conveyed his interest in the same to the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, of this city, and that the new owners will take her in charge immediately.  The Hurt will be placed on the marine railway and will undergo a thorough overhauling after which she will resume her run on the Cape Fear river as an additional freight and passenger boat with the steamer “Tar Heel” now operated by the above company.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, March 16, 1905]

The Old Steamer Hurt.

There is an impression prevalent among the people that the steamer Hurt, of the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, was simply to be overhauled, whereas the fact is that the Government Inspector condemned it.  Hence, the company decided to build a new boat, steel hull and modern in every respect, and the name will be changed.  Probably the name will be the Cape Fear,, and they hope to have it ready by September 1st.

Mr. Martin, the general manager, informs the OBSERVER that he hopes to have the new boat second to none that has ever been on the river.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, May 25, 1905]

Excursion on the Tar Heel.

The Tar Heel, returning with the excursionists who left Fayetteville Monday for Wilmington, left the latter place Tuesday evening at 7:30 o’clock, and will reach here sometime this afternoon, says the Observer.  Among the Fayetteville people who went down on the Tar Heel were the following:  Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Buckingham, Mrs. Thos. W. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Beasley and children, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. A. Vann, Miss Sallie Vann, Mrs. A. E. Martin, Mrs. Myra Cain, Messrs. F. D. Williams, J. d. Calais, L. H. Miller and Albert Hollingsworth.

[Wilmington Dispatch —  June 22, 1905]

THE DROWNING OF YOUNG

MR. PATE.

His Body Reaches Fayetteville.

The remains of Mr. Hector Lloyd Pate, of Sherwood, this county, who was drowned Friday night by falling overboard from the steamer Tar Heel while the boat was on her way to Fayetteville, reached here at noon from Wilmington and was taken throughout the country to his home for burial.  The body was discovered yesterday floating near the place where the accident occurred, by Capt. Jim Williams, of the steam tug Navassa.

The Wilmington Star of Tuesday says:

Mr. Pate came to the city Friday on an excursion run by the owners of the steamer Tar Heel and spent the day here.  When the boat started on the return trip he was safely on board the steamer.  When near Mount Misery about seven miles from this city.  Mr. Pate went to descend the stairs leading from the upper to the lower deck.  In some way he tripped and fell and being unable to stop himself rolled overboard.  A boat was lowered immediately and a thorough search made for the body.  The unfortunate young man, however, was beyond mortal aid, as no trace of him was discovered whatsoever.

The father of the young man was immediately made aware of the sad end that had come to his son and he and Mr. Lloyd Hall, a neighbor and friend, went down to the spot Saturday morning where the accident happened and made a search for the body.  However, it was not recovered until yesterday morning.

Early in the morning Engineer George Grimsley while sitting in the engineer’s room of the tug Navassa, which tug was tied up to the factory wharf at Navassa, saw a body floating face downward in the water about 20 feet from the boat.  He immediately informed Captain Williams of his discovery and preparations for the recovery of the body were made at one.

Some time elapsed before the boat went after the body.  When the body was overtaken it was about one mile down Brunswick river, the tide having carried it that distance.

The body was towed back to Navassa and Dr. Moore, the coroner of Brunswick county, was sent for.  After viewing the remains he deemed an inquest unnecessary and gave permission for its removal and burial.

Mr. Freeman Yopp, assistant of Mr. W. F. Yopp, undertaker went to Navassa and brought the body to the city about 1 o’clock yesterday.  It was carried to the Yopp undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.  The body, of course, after its long stay in the water was in a bad condition.  It was very much discolored and decomposition had already begun.

Young Mr. Pate was about 24 years old and leaves to mourn his unexpected and extremely sad death a feather, a mother, three brothers and three sisters.  Mr. Pate was a farmer and had a reputation for being a young man of integrity and good character.

—–

Funeral of Young Mr. Pate.

The funeral of Mr. Hector Lloyd Pate, who met death by falling from the steamer Tar Heel and drowning, took place Tuesday at the residence of the deceased’ father, Mr. James Pate, near Sherwood.  The services were conducted by Mr. Preston Stamps in the presence of a large concourse of neighbors and friends.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, August 24, 1905]

—  Fayetteville Observer:  “The water in the Cape Fear remains at 1.9 feet.  The Tar Heel stuck on a sand shoal at Walker’s Bluff as she was bound for Fayetteville.  Arrangements are being made to have her cargo transferred to the railroad.”

[Wilmington Star – October 5, 1905]

The new steel hull steamer C. W. Lyon, was launched yesterday at the Skinner shipyard and she was the first steel hull boat ever constructed in the state of North Carolina.  Miss Nettie Keith King, daughter of Mr. S. M. King, agent for the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, christened the new vessel as she glided into the peaceful waters of the Cape Fear.

The boat is named after Sheriff Lyon, of Bladen county, who is president of the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, owners of the boat.  The Lyon is 125 feet long, 25 feet in beam, with stern wheel and has a capacity for 50 passengers and 300 tons of freight.  Her engines are of 500 horse power.  The wood work of the boat will be completed in Fayetteville and she was towed there last night.  It will take about three weeks to complete the work and the Lyon will then be put on the run between Wilmington and Fayetteville.

The Wilmington Iron Works expects to go into the business of boat building, having been so successful with their first attempt.  The Tar Heel Steamboat Company got bids on specifications for a boat of the Lyon’s size from a number of ship building firms at different towns of the south Atlantic coast and the price paid the Wilmington Iron Works was fully 25 per cent. less than any bid received.

The company owning the Lyon also owns the Tar Heel.  The new boat will be put on her run about December 1st and will be quite an addition to the fleet of Cape Fear boats.  Business between Wilmington and Fayetteville and intermediate points is increasing rapidly and there is no reason why a large business, both passenger and freight, should not be done by the Lyon.  Mr. S. M. King will be the Wilmington agent.  A crew has not yet been selected.

[Wilmington Messenger – November 9, 1905 BRC]

Fayetteville, N. C., Nov. 11.  —  The older people of Fayetteville have a real affection dating many years back, for the steamer A. P. Hurt, with her long lifetime of fine service on the river.  Many will doubtless walk down to see her while overhauling in Campbellton.  Newly christened and newly dressed may she have a long career of good fortune.

[Wilmington Messenger – November 12, 1905 BRC]

STEAMBOATING ON THE CAPE FEAR.

The Dublin correspondent of the Clarkton Express writes that paper as follows:

It appears that steamboating is to regain its former prestige on the upper Cape Fear.  The Tar Heel Steamboat Company are at present running the steamer Tar Heel, and will soon place the fine new steamer C. W. Lyon in commission on the river.  The company has been very successful since its organization, the Tar Heel having paid handsomely and the growing business of the company necessitated the building of another boat.  The C. W. Lyon is said to be the first iron hull boat ever built in North Carolina.  It is an up to date boat, and will be equipped with all modern conveniences, including electric lights.  A few months ago Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, purchased the magnificent steamer City of Fayetteville, and organized a stock company to operate it, and the steamer is now making regular trips between Wilmington and Fayetteville.  With the C. W. Lyon and the City of Fayetteville, both plying the waters of this important stream, the passenger and freight accommodations will be superb.  During the past several years farmers have been greatly annoyed during the spring months on account of freight congestion on the river, but now the boats will be able to handle the freight all right, which will be a great advantage to those getting their freight by water along the river.  They will also carry much through freight, because they furnish much cheaper rates than the railroads do.

[Fayetteville Observer – February 8, 1906]

The Cape Fear River Steamers
https://bgibson135.wordpress.com

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Posted by on April 26, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

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