RSS

The Steamer TAR HEEL

16 Oct

THE RIVER TRAFFIC.
—–
Sixth Annual Meeting Yesterday
of Merchants’ and Farmers’
Steamboat Company.

—–
UNDER ONE MANAGEMENT.
—–

in Future All Lines, Except City of Fayetteville, Will Be Operated Conjointly—New Light Draught Steamer Being Built Here—Notes.

—–

The sixth annual meeting of the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Company was held at the general offices in this city upon the arrival of the steamer Highlander yesterday. Mr. Oliver Evans, of Fayetteville, president, and Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, secretary and treasurer and general manager of the company, were the officers present.

The general discussion of the business of the past year, which was entirely satisfactory, was indulged in and all the old officers were re-elected unanimously. The company operates the steamer Highlander between Wilmington and Fayetteville and now has in process of construction a new boat of light draught and good freight capacity to be known as the Tar Heel. She is being built near foot of Chesnut street and will be admirably adapted to the Cape Fear traffic.

One of the most important announcements as a result of the meeting yesterday was that the steamers Hurt and Highlander and E. A. Hawes and Tar Heel will continue to be operated under one management, notwithstanding the withdrawl of the City of Fayetteville, against which the Merchants’ and Farmers’ and Cape Fear Steamboat companies most emphatically claim there was no discrimination.

Mr. T. D. Love will be general freight agent here of the Hurt, Highlander, Tar Heel and Hawes, the latter being employed on the Northeast and Black river lines, and Col. W. S. Cook will be general freight agent for the steamers at Fayetteville. Mr. James Madden, who was formerly general agent here for the Hurt and Hawes, becomes chief clerk to General Manager Love.

All the steamers land at Mr. Love’s wharf, nearly opposite the rear of the Front street market house, though the company still retains possession of the wharf, next south of the foot of Chesnut street. The new arrangement promises exceedingly well. Schedules will be strictly adhered to as far as possible and the freight office will remain open until 4 P. M. of each steamer day.

[Wilmington Star – February 27, 1903]

NEW STEAMER FINISHED.

The new steamer Tar Heel, built by the Merchants’ & Farmers’ Steamboat Company, T. D. Love, manager, is about completed and will begin running in about a week. She will run between Wilmington and Fayetteville.

[Wilmington Dispatch — May 12, 1903]

New Boat for the Cape Fear.

The Wilmington Star of Wednesday says:

The new steamer “Tar Heel”, built by the Merchants’ & Farmers’ Steamboat Company, is about completed and will begin running in about a week between Wilmington and Fayetteville.

This will make five boats plying between Fayetteville and Wilmington.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, May 21, 1903]

” Tar Heel ” in Commission.

The ” Tar Heel, ” the new steamer recently built in this city by the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Co., of which Mr. T. D. Love is general manager, cleared yesterday for her initial trip to Fayetteville, taking the run of the ” Highlander, ” which remains in port. The new steamer, while not so large as the ” Highlander, ” is a model boat for the river trade and by reason of her construction is able to navigate in very shallow water. Capt. Robeson and crew of the ” Highlander ” were transferred here to the ” Tar Heel. ”

[Wilmington Morning Star — Thursday, May 28, 1903]

Steamer ” Tar Heel. ”

The steamer ” Tar Heel, ” Capt. William Robeson, the new boat just completed by the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Co., will arrive to-day from her maiden trip up the Cape Fear river and will bring down for a complimentary trip a number of the up-river merchants. The “Tar Heel ” is admirably adapted ot the river traffic. She is 101 feet long, 21 feet wide, 4 ½ feet deep and is 99 gross and 67 net tons register. She was built by Mr. J. B. Gaskill, the well known ship carpenter.

[Wilmington Morning Star — Saturday, May 30, 1903]

The “Tar Heel” Coming.

The Wilmington Star of Thursday says:

The “Tar Heel,” the new steamer recently built in this city by the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Co., of which Mr. T. D. Love is general manager, cleared yesterday for her initial trip to Fayetteville, taking the run of the “Highlander,” which remains in port. The new steamer, while not so large as the “Highlander,” is a model boat for the river trade and by reason of her construction is able to navigate in very shallow water. Capt. Robeson and crew of the “Highlander” were transferred here to the “Tar Heel.”

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, June 4, 1903]

RIVER STEAMER SUNK.

—–

Tar Heel Goes To the Bottom At

Point Above Elizabethtown.

—–

The steamer Tar Heel, of the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Company, which left Wilmington Thursday afternoon for Fayetteville, sunk the same night at Old Court House Landing over 60 miles from here. General Manager T. D. Love, of the company, received a telegram yesterday stating that the steamer had gone to the bottom and he left at once for the scene of the accident. It is expected that the Tar Heel will be raised in a few days. She was in charge of Capt. W. McK. Robinson and had a cargo of merchandise for points along the upper Cape Fear.

[Wilmington Dispatch – September 19, 1903]

SINKING OF THE TAR HEEL

—–

Lighter Carried to the Scene by the

City of Fayetteville – Cargo Landed

Without Loss.

—–

The steamer City of Fayetteville, which arrived yesterday from Fayetteville, brought news from the scene of the sinking of the Tar Heel at Old Court House Landing, sixty miles from here. It appears that the Tar Heel only sank about five feet as the depth of the water was very shallow at the spot where the accident happened and consequently none of the cargo was damaged, as it was all above deck. The accident was due to hole being “stove” in the bottom of the boat by a floating log.

The City of Fayetteville towed a lighter to receive the cargo, which had in the meantime been landed safely and without loss. From last reports the Tar Heel was still above water, though disabled, and will be saved unless the rise in the river wrecks her. The steamer Highlander, which left here Friday, with General Manager T. D. Love, of the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Company, aboard, has by now arrived on the scene. The Tar Heel belonged to the company mentioned

The steamer Hurt, which both arrived and left here yesterday, was near the Landing when the accident occurred.

——-

STEAMER TAR HEEL SUNK.

—–

Accident at Court House Landing.

After Neary Fifty Years.

—–

(Special to The Messenger.)

Fayetteville, N. C., September 19. – It was about 2:30 o’clock yesterday when Mr. Frank Glover, the agent, received news of the sinking of the Steamer Tar Heel on her upward trip at Court House Landing, about thirty-four miles from this city. The details, up to this writing are meager, and it is not known whether a log or a rock in the steamer at that point broke into the steamer’s keel. Mr. Glover dispatched a light as soon as possible to take off the cargo; and, as the water was low, the hull only, not the decks, went under. There was a rise of three or four feet in the river last night, but if the unloading was accomplished before the rise reached the point, the cargo can be saved. It consisted of general merchandise, among other things 25,000 pounds of lard for the Armfield Company. The Tar Heel was a wooden boat, built last spring, mainly for the freighting business…

[Wilmington Messenger — September 20, 1903]

About the Sinking of the Tar Heel.

The steamer Highlander arrived yesterday morning from the scene of the accident to the steamer Tar Heel, at Old Court House Landing, and left again in the afternoon, carrying back two lighters to use in floating the disabled vessel. President T. D. Love came down on the Highlander and returned with her.

The cargo of the Tar Heel was carried safely to Fayeeteville on a lighter.

[Wilmington Messenger – September 22, 1903]

THE TAR HEEL SINKS.

—–

A Wrecking crew Sent from Here to Her

Assistance.

—–

Mr. Frank Glover received word Friday afternoon that the Tar Heel of the Merchants and Farmers’ Steamboat Company, had gone to the bottom at Old Court House, two miles this side of Elizabethtown, and 34 miles from Fayetteville. Mr. Glover immediately got together a salvage crew, and dispatched them with a lighter, in tow of the City of Fayetteville, which happened to be on the point of pulling out for Wilmington, to the scene of the wreck. No other particulars were received, but Mr. Glover thinks that the cargo was probably saved, as the stage of water, at the time the boat sank, was only 3 10 feet, which would leave her decks above water. However, unless the work of salvage was done quickly, the cargo may have been lost, as the river was rising rapidly at the time, and this morning at 8 o’clock the guage showed 9 feet.

How the accident occurred is not known, but it is possible she struck a rock, as there are a number of dangerous ones at Old Court House.

The Tar Heel is a new boat, having been launched in the spring. She is 85 tons burden, and is considered a staunch craft. Captain William Robeson was in command, here engineers were Bryan Jones and his son, and the pilots were Henry Edge and LeRoy Smith.

At the time of the accident, the Tar Heel had only about a 25 ton cargo, consisting mostly of lard for the Armfield Company.

The Wilmington Star of Saturday morning says:

The steamer “Tar Heel,” of the Merchants and Farmers’ Steamboat Co., plying regularly between Wilmington and Fayetteville went to the bottom night before last at Old Court House Landing, above Elizabethtown, on the Cape Fear river. Whether she foundered while tied up for the night or ran upon shoals in that vicinity and punched a hole in her bottom was not stated in a telegram received by General Manager T. D. Love, of this city, yesterday. Mr. Love left at once for the scene of the accident and hopes to have the steamer afloat in a short time.

The “Tar Heel” was in command of Capt. W. McK. Robeson, and was bound up the river with a cargo of general merchandise for upper Cape Fear points. No particulars of the accident could be learned here yesterday.


The Tar Heel’s Cargo Saved.

The City of Fayetteville arrived from Wilmington Sunday evening. Capt. Bradshaw says that when he reached the Tar Heel with the wrecking crew and lighter on Friday, the cargo had already been landed on the shore. The Tar Heel was lying in five feet of water at that time, and later when the real freshet came, her upper deck was just visible. The accident was caused by an uncharted stump, which stove a hole in her bottom.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, September 24, 1903.]


NEW STEAMBOAT COMPANY

HAS BEEN ORGANIZED.

——

Steamers City of Fayetteville, Highlander

and Hurt Under One Control.

——

The South Atlantic Transit Company has been formed, an has secured control of the Merchants’ and Farmers, Cape Fear and Fayetteville and Wilmington Steamboat companies. This gives the new company control of the steamers City of Fayetteville, Highlander and A. P. Hurt, the best steamers on the river.

The new line went into effect today. The South Atlantic Transit Company is composed of Messrs. A. A. Lisman, of New York; Duncan McEachern and T. D. Love, of Wilmington, and W. S. Cook, of Fayetteville.

Mr. Love is general agent at Wilmington, and Mr. W. S. Cook general agent at Fayetteville.

All the boats of the company are tied up on account of low water. The river is lower now than it has been in two years, there being only about a foot of water at Fayetteville.

The City of Fayetteville is tied up here, the Highlander at Fayetteville, and the Hurt at Court House Falls.

The company will operate only two steamers on a regular schedule.

Yesterday’s Fayetteville Observer has this to say of the deal:

Tomorrow the South Atlantic Transit Company, recently incorporated under the laws of New York, will assume charge of the steamboat traffic on the Cape Fear between Fayetteville and Wilmington.

This company has leased the following steamers: The A. P. Hurt, of the Peoples and Cape Fear Steamboat Company; The Highlander, of the Farmers’ and Merchants Steamboat Co.; and the City of Fayetteville, of the Fayetteville and Wilmington Steamboat Co. These three boats are the pick of the Cape Fear river fleet, with the exception of the Tar Heel, recently built. What disposition will be made of the Tar Heel and the Hawes, which boats are owned by two of the above companies, we are not yet able to say.

Col. W. S. Cook is the general freight and passenger agent of the new company, and Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, is superintendent of transportation.

[Wilmington Dispatch – October 1, 1903]

The steamer Tar Heel, which went to the bottom several weeks ago, was raised and brought down under her own steam. She is on the marine railway.

[Wilmington Dispatch — October 13, 1903]

NEW STEAMBOAT LINE.

—–

Company Formed To Compete For

Upper Cape Fear Traffic.

—–

A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown. The stockholders are leading men of that place. The chief promoter and principal stockholder is Mr. A. E. Martin, of Fayetteville, who will be the general agent.

A line of boats will be operated on the upper Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company, which is now operating four steamers on the river, viz: City of Fayetteville, Highlander, Hurt and E. A. Hawes.

At a meeting of the directors of the new company in Elizabethtown Wednesday morning it was decided to purchase the steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city. The sale will be confirmed in Wilmington next Monday and the steamer will be put on a schedule by the new company. The Tar Heel is a comparatively new boat. She is 100 feet long, 20 feet wide and is considered the lightest draught boat on the river. The purchase price has not been made public but we understand the new company got a good trade. The name of the Wilmington agent for the line has not been announced.

[Wilmington Dispatch – January 22, 1904]

New Steamboat Line for the River.

Says the Wilmington Dispatch:

A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown. The stockholders are leading men of that place. The chief promoter and principal stockholder is Mr. A. E. Martin, of Fayetteville, who will be the general agent.

A line of boats will be operated on the upper Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company, which is now operating four steamers on the river, viz: City of Fayetteville, Highlander, Hurt and E. A. Hawes.

At a meeting of the directors of the new company in Elizabethtown Wednesday morning it was decided to purchase the steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city. The sale will be confirmed in Wilmington next Monday and the steamer will be put on a schedule by the new company. The Tar Heel is a comparatively new boat. She is 100 feet long, 20 feet wide and is considered the lightest draught boat on the river. The purchase price has not been made public but we understand the new company got a good trade. The name of the Wilmington agent for the line has not been announced.

Says the Wilmington correspondent of the Raleigh Post:

A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown, N. C. Mr. E. A. Martin, of Fayetteville, is the principal stockholder and general agent. The company will operate a line of steamers on the Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company. The new company has purchased the Steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city. The line will be in operation next week.

It was officially announced that Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, the well known steamboat man, will operate a line of steamers on the Santee and Congaree rivers between Georgetown and Columbia, S. C., a distance of two hundred miles. This is one of the most important river transportation ventures ever made in the Carolinas. The new line will open up one of the best farming sections of South Carolina, besides giving Columbia an all water route to New York, using the Clyde Line, which runs to Georgetown. It will also give a water route from Charleston to Columbia via Georgetown. The business men of Columbia, feeling that the railroad rates on freight are excessive, started the movement to establish an all water line and have guaranteed Mr. Love a large tonnage. The new line will be in operation in two weeks. Steamers from the Cape Fear river fleet will be used on the Georgetown and Columbia line.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, January 28, 1904]

— The river steamer “Tar Heel” has been delivered to the new company at Elizabethtown, which recently purchased the boat.

[?? – January 31, 1904]

TAR HEEL STEAMBOAT CO.

—–

New Line Between Wilmington and Fayetteville Now in Operation.

The steamer “Tar Heel,” recently purchased by the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, of Elizabethtown, arrived yesterday on its maiden trip under the new management. Capt. Jeff Bradshaw, the veteran steamboat man, is master of the “Tar Heel” and the wharf at foot of Chesnut street has been engaged by the new company as a landing for the boat. Mr. S. M. King, of Elizabethtown, will be Wilmington agent for the new boat and will look after its interests at this end of the line.

Mr. E. C. Clark, of Elizabethtown, one of the stockholders of the new company, was here yesterday installing the new agent in his office.

[?? — February 7, 1904]

Tar Heel Steamboat Company.

Says the Wilmington Star, of Sunday.

The steamer “Tar Heel,” recently purchased by the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, of Elizabethtown, arrived yesterday on its maiden trip under the new management. Capt. Jeff Bradshaw, the veteran steamboat man, is master of the “Tar Heel” and the wharf at foot of Chestnut street has been engaged by the new company as a landing for the new boat. Mr. S. M King, of Elizabethtown, will be the Wilmington agent for the new boat and will look after its interests at this end of the line.

Mr. E. C. Clark, of Elizabethtown, one of the stockholders of the new company, was here yesterday installing the new agent in his office.

[Fayetteville Observer – Feb. 11, 1904]

The New Boat Line.

Says the Elizabethtown correspondent of the Clarkton Express:

The steamer Tar Heel, recently purchased by the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, made its initial trip last Friday, carrying a large freight and several passengers.

The above named company has been incorporated and a board of directors elected as follows: A. E. Martin, J. B. McFadyen, C. W. Lyon, J. O. West and J. S. Williamson. At a meeting of the board of directors the following officers were elected: President, C. W. Lyon; Treasurer, A. E. Martin; Secretary, J. S. Williamson. A. E. Martin is general manager, with offices at Fayetteville, and S. M. King agent at Wilmington. The boat will leave Fayetteville on Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a. m. and Wilmington on Tuesdays and Fridays at 4 o’clock p. m. The people living along the Cape Fear River are to be congratulated on having competitive lines, which will secure fair treatment and reasonable rates.

[The Fayetteville Observer – February 18, 1904]

To Rebuild the Steamer Hurt.

The Wilmington Star of Saturday says:

Mr. W. J. Meredith, who purchased the steamer A. P. Hurt at receiver’s sale recently, announces that he has conveyed his interest in the same to the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, of this city, and that the new owners will take her in charge immediately. The Hurt will be placed on the marine railway and will undergo a thorough overhauling after which she will resume her run on the Cape Fear river as an additional freight and passenger boat with the steamer “Tar Heel” now operated by the above company.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, March 16, 1905]

Excursion on the Tar Heel.

The Tar Heel, returning with the excursionists who left Fayetteville Monday for Wilmington, left the latter place Tuesday evening at 7:30 o’clock, and will reach here sometime this afternoon, says the Observer. Among the Fayetteville people who went down on the Tar Heel were the following: Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Buckingham, Mrs. Thos. W. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Beasley and children, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. A. Vann, Miss Sallie Vann, Mrs. A. E. Martin, Mrs. Myra Cain, Messrs. F. D. Williams, J. d. Calais, L. H. Miller and Albert Hollingsworth.

[Wilmington Dispatch — June 22, 1905]

THE DROWNING OF YOUNG

MR. PATE.

His Body Reaches Fayetteville.

The remains of Mr. Hector Lloyd Pate, of Sherwood, this county, who was drowned Friday night by falling overboard from the steamer Tar Heel while the boat was on her way to Fayetteville, reached here at noon from Wilmington and was taken throughout the country to his home for burial. The body was discovered yesterday floating near the place where the accident occurred, by Capt. Jim Williams, of the steam tug Navassa.

The Wilmington Star of Tuesday says:

Mr. Pate came to the city Friday on an excursion run by the owners of the steamer Tar Heel and spent the day here. When the boat started on the return trip he was safely on board the steamer. When near Mount Misery about seven miles from this city. Mr. Pate went to descend the stairs leading from the upper to the lower deck. In some way he tripped and fell and being unable to stop himself rolled overboard. A boat was lowered immediately and a thorough search made for the body. The unfortunate young man, however, was beyond mortal aid, as no trace of him was discovered whatsoever.

The father of the young man was immediately made aware of the sad end that had come to his son and he and Mr. Lloyd Hall, a neighbor and friend, went down to the spot Saturday morning where the accident happened and made a search for the body. However, it was not recovered until yesterday morning.

Early in the morning Engineer George Grimsley while sitting in the engineer’s room of the tug Navassa, which tug was tied up to the factory wharf at Navassa, saw a body floating face downward in the water about 20 feet from the boat. He immediately informed Captain Williams of his discovery and preparations for the recovery of the body were made at one.

Some time elapsed before the boat went after the body. When the body was overtaken it was about one mile down Brunswick river, the tide having carried it that distance.

The body was towed back to Navassa and Dr. Moore, the coroner of Brunswick county, was sent for. After viewing the remains he deemed an inquest unnecessary and gave permission for its removal and burial.

Mr. Freeman Yopp, assistant of Mr. W. F. Yopp, undertaker went to Navassa and brought the body to the city about 1 o’clock yesterday. It was carried to the Yopp undertaking establishment and prepared for burial. The body, of course, after its long stay in the water was in a bad condition. It was very much discolored and decomposition had already begun.

Young Mr. Pate was about 24 years old and leaves to mourn his unexpected and extremely sad death a feather, a mother, three brothers and three sisters. Mr. Pate was a farmer and had a reputation for being a young man of integrity and good character.

—–

Funeral of Young Mr. Pate.

The funeral of Mr. Hector Lloyd Pate, who met death by falling from the steamer Tar Heel and drowning, took place Tuesday at the residence of the deceased’ father, Mr. James Pate, near Sherwood. The services were conducted by Mr. Preston Stamps in the presence of a large concourse of neighbors and friends.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, August 24, 1905]

— Fayetteville Observer: “The water in the Cape Fear remains at 1.9 feet. The Tar Heel stuck on a sand shoal at Walker’s Bluff as she was bound for Fayetteville. Arrangements are being made to have her cargo transferred to the railroad.”

[Wilmington Star – October 5, 1905]

STEAMBOATING ON THE CAPE FEAR.

The Dublin correspondent of the Clarkton Express writes that paper as follows:

It appears that steamboating is to regain its former prestige on the upper Cape Fear. The Tar Heel Steamboat Company are at present running the steamer Tar Heel, and will soon place the fine new steamer C. W. Lyon in commission on the river. The company has been very successful since its organization, the Tar Heel having paid handsomely and the growing business of the company necessitated the building of another boat. The C. W. Lyon is said to be the first iron hull boat ever built in North Carolina. It is an up to date boat, and will be equipped with all modern conveniences, including electric lights. A few months ago Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, purchased the magnificent steamer City of Fayetteville, and organized a stock company to operate it, and the steamer is now making regular trips between Wilmington and Fayetteville. With the C. W. Lyon and the City of Fayetteville, both plying the waters of this important stream, the passenger and freight accommodations will be superb. During the past several years farmers have been greatly annoyed during the spring months on account of freight congestion on the river, but now the boats will be able to handle the freight all right, which will be a great advantage to those getting their freight by water along the river. They will also carry much through freight, because they furnish much cheaper rates than the railroads do.

[Fayetteville Observer – February 8, 1906]

Capt. LeRoy Smith has succeeded Capt. Henry Edge as master of the steamer City of Fayetteville. Capt. Edge goes on the steamer Tar Heel, succeeding Capt. Jeff Bradshaw, who is now in command of the new steamer Lisbon.

[Wilmington Star – March 7, 1906]

BOATS IN COLLISION

—–

River Steamers Tar Heel and Lyon Together With Crash Early Yesterday Morning

—–

MISUNDERSTOOD SIGNALS

—–

Accident Eighteen Miles Up Cape Fear. Colored fireman Severely Injured and Brought to Hospital In This City.

—–

As the result of a misunderstanding of signals by the pilots of the respective boats, the river steamers Tar Heel and C. W. Lyon, both belonging to the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, of which Mr. S. M. King is agent in this city, were in collision eighteen miles above Wilmington on the Cape Fear river yesterday morning about 4 o’clock. The Tar Heel was slightly broken up and came into port slightly leaking. The Lyon, being of iron hull, was not damaged and proceeded to Fayetteville. Frank Cain, colored fireman on the Tar Heel, was jammed between a pile of wood on the deck of his boat and the colliding steamer, the result being that all the flesh was torn from the calf of his right leg to the bone, a very severe injury.

The Tar Heel was bound to Wilmington with light cargo of naval stores and about 20 steerage and cabin passengers. The Lyon was bound to Fayetteville with general cargo. It was yet dark when they met at Raccoon Bluff, the channel being very crooked at that point. Each steamer blew one blast of its whistle, meaning to pass to starboard. As they met and were in an oblique position, the Tar Heel blew four whistles, which means reduce speed and come along side. The man in charge was slow to read the signal or it was given too slowly and the Lyon took it that they were to pass otherwise than first signaled. The Lyon changed her course and the Tar Heel was struck on the port side by the other boat, both at reduced speed, however. Fireman Cain started to run aft to escape but was caught on the pile of wood and severely jammed. No bones were broken but the tearing of the flesh from the calf of his leg was a frightful injury and he will be laid up several weeks in the hospital in consequence thereof. He has been on the river a number of years and has a family at Fayetteville. The stair case of the Tar Heel was torn down on the port side and the hog chain parted. The guards were carried away and the hull was cut into, causing the steamer to leak somewhat. However, the pumps were put to work by Capt. J. A. Peoples, the engineer, and she came into port in good shape about 8:15 o’clock in the morning. Temporary repairs were made and the steamer expected to resume her schedule last night.

The injured fireman was brought to Wilmington on the steamer and taken out to the James Walker Memorial Hospital in the ambulance. Capt. Jeff Bradshaw is master of the steamer Lyon and Capt. Henry Edge is master of the Tar Heel. They desired to come alongside and exchange a pilot when the accident occurred.

[Wilmington Star – April 18, 1906]

STEAMERS IN COLLISION.

—–

The Tar Heel and the Lyon Come
Together on the Cape Fear.

—–

Yesterday morning, before daylight, the Steamers Tar Heel and C. W. Lyon, meeting on the Cape Fear, and desiring to exchange a pilot, by some misunderstanding came into collision, being about 18 miles above Wilmington. The Tar Heel was somewhat broken up, and went into its wharf at Wilmington leaking; the Lyon was not damaged, and proceeded on its way to Fayetteville. Frank Cain, colored fireman on the Tar Heel, was jammed against a pile of wood, receiving a severe injury to his leg, and was carried to the Memorial Walker Hospital in Wilmington.

[Fayetteville Observer – April 19, 1906]

— Mr. S. M. King, agent for the Tar Heel Steamboat Company, leaves this evening for his old home in Pennsylvania where he will spend a week or ten days. During his absence, Mr. W. J. Davis, purser on the Tar Heel, will be in charge of the agency of the line in this city.

[Wilmington Star — May 20, 1906]

The steamer Tar Heel having undergone an overhauling resumed her running on the river today.

[Wilmington Dispatch — June 19. 1906]

— The steamer Tar Heel, of the Wilmington and Fayetteville line, is laid up at her wharf here for a day or two, having broken her crank shaft on the last trip down. She will repair and proceed as soon as possible{.} The steamers C. W. Lyon and City of Fayetteville cleared last night for the return to Fayetteville.

[Wilmington Star — October 23, 1906]

A River Steamer Tragedy.

John McDowell, a young negro deck hand on the steamer C. W. Lyon, was shot twice in the shoulder by Engineer J. A. Peoples, of Fayetteville, on the deck of the boat, which was lying at the wharf in Wilmington, Friday p.m. between 6 and 7 o’clock, and may die as the result of the wound. He is in the Hospital and Dr. Gray, of the hospital staff, who made an examination of the wound, found that one of the main arteries had been severed and that the patient was having internal hemorrhages. Engineer Peoples claims that the shooting was in self-defense and gave himself up at the police station at once. Pending the result of McDowell’s injuries he is being held without bond.

Mr. Peoples’ version of the affair is to the effect that he was employed to go on the steamer Lyon to Fayetteville to bring the boat back, while the regular engineer went up on vacation. Mr. People’s is regularly employed as engineer of the steamer Tar Heel of the same company which is now laid up for repairs. He said that he went aboard the Lyon yesterday evening. The negro was crowding the passage-way and he told him to get out of the way. McDowell went off cursing him. The engineer said he went on board the Tar Heel, which lay alongside, to get his belongings to transfer to the Lyon; that as he was crossing over to the Lyon in the dark some one shouted to him to lookout and as he turned his head the negro had an iron spade drawn to strike him. In self-defense he drew the pistol and fired twice. The negro dropped and later the ambulance was summoned and he was taken to the hospital.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, November 15, 1906]

— The steamer Tar Heel, of the Tar Heel Steamboat Company will be laid up here some time for repairs. The steamer Lyon is making the regular schedule to Fayetteville and was here yesterday, clearing at 6 o’clock yesterday evening for the return.

[?? – November 17, 1906]

Inspecting River Steamboats.

United States Steamboat Inspectors Fred B. Rice and J. T. Borden Thursday inspected the steamer City of Fayetteville and also the Tar Heel. The City of Fayetteville was found to be in good condition, but such was not the case with the Tar Heel. The Wilmington Messenger says that when the inspectors went on the steamer they found men at work patching the boiler, which appeared not to be in the best of condition. After examining the boiler Supervising Inspector Oast advised his local inspectors to condemn the boiler, which of course, will be done. The boiler has been in use for the past 26 years and is said to be absolutely worn out. It will take some time to get a new boiler here and get it installed, so the Tar Heel will be out of commission for some time to come. Both of these boats run between Wilmington and Fayetteville.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, November 29, 1906]

Advertisements
 
Comments Off on The Steamer TAR HEEL

Posted by on October 16, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Comments are closed.

 
%d bloggers like this: