RSS

A Judge, a Justice, a Governor, a Senator, a Vice-President & Several Presidents.

I may have mentioned this elsewhere, but since I don’t recall, here goes.

David Davis is one of the most interesting men I have ever read about.  I first heard his name when I came across a New York Times newspaper article (archived) from 1883.  The story appeared to be at least two full newspaper columns and was written about the marriage of David Davis and his fiance, in Fayetteville, NC, at Tokay Vineyards (owned by Wharton J. Green).  I think the marriage was held about 10 am, and within the hour, Davis and his bride were boarding the paddlewheel steamer, Governor Worth, and heading down the Cape Fear river to Wilmington, NC for the start of their Honeymoon vacation.  After Wilmington, I think the couple made it down to Charleston, SC and then headed West.  I think the original intent was for Davis and bride to go to California.  I don’t recall for what purpose, but then eventually ending up in Illinois (I hope it was Ill. and not Indiana.).

When I first read this story, I thought that David Davis might be some local dignitary or prominent person from Fayetteville.  Nothing in the story gave a clue as to who Davis was, and I had surely never heard of him.  I googled for David Davis and Fayetteville, NC but there was nothing.  At least a couple of years passed, and I returned to the story and googled again for “David Davis. ”  This time there were several online articles about Davis and his story began to bloom.

David Davis was a contemporary of Abraham Lincoln.  In fact, Judge Davis tried a good number of legal cases brought by Lincoln, and did not always find in favor of Mr. Lincoln.  Davis became the campaign manager for Lincoln, and was instrumental in getting Abe elected.  I recall that Davis prompted fellow judges to support Lincoln’s presidency which got him elected.

After Lincoln was elected President, he did not immediately reward David Davis.  A couple of years later, President Lincoln appointed David Davis to be a Supreme Court Justice.

When Lincoln was assassinated, Todd, his son, contacted Justice Davis and asked that he come to Washington to act as Executor of President Lincoln’s estate.  *I do not know, but I would imagine there were several executors involved.  Davis was quite candid about Mrs. Lincoln, not describing her in favorable terms.  I think the article I read by Davis had him mention that Mary Lincoln was a kleptomaniac.

Davis was a Supreme Court Justice for about 12 years, and then he ran for the US Senate, representing Illinois, and was elected.

I do not recall the order of events, but Davis’ first wife took ill and died.  Her nurse during her illness, perhaps a young protege, was almost 30 years younger than Justice Davis.  I think Mrs. Davis died either shortly before or after Davis was elected to the US Senate.  Justice Davis and the young woman remained in contact after he became a widower.

Senator David Davis was elected President Pro Tempore during his first, and only US Senate term.  James A. Garfield was elected President of the United States and his Vice President was Chester A. Arthur.  President Garfield was assassinated.  Arthur’s wife died before he took office as President of the United States.  At the time, there was no process for replacing the Vice President, so David Davis became acting Vice President because of his position in the US Senate.  If President Arthur had died during office, Senator Davis would have become an unelected US President.

As I said earlier, David Davis and Adeline Burr had remained in contact after his first wife’s death.  I seem to recall they corresponded and when in Washington visited together.  With President Arthur being widowed, there was no First Lady in the White House.  Davis was also widowed, so Addie was treated as acting First Lady, but this was something she did not wish upon herself.  In fact, Senator Davis did not run for a second term in the Senate because Ms. Burr said she would not marry him with the possibility that she might become the First Lady of the US.

So, about 10 days after his US Senate term ended, Senator Davis came to Fayetteville, NC aboard a train, from Washington, DC via Richmond, VA.

The New York Times Reporter that had been assigned to follow Davis painted a bleak picture of travel to and from Fayetteville, and his stay in Fayetteville was portrayed no better.  The reporter, who was nameless, left a perpetual legacy of his pettiness, when he named the paddlewheel steamer as the General Worth, not Governor Worth, in his article.

The NY Times reporter did not travel down the Cape Fear on the Governor Worth, with the Davis entourage, but traveled the next day aboard the D. Murchison.

Senator Davis was 68 years old when he married Addie Burr, who was 40 years old, 28 years his junior.  Addie had been staying with her cousin, XXX the wife of W. J. Green at Tokay Vineyard, a short distance from Fayetteville, NC.

Senator Davis died just three years after he was married for the second time.  The wife of Wharton J. Green had died only a few months after Addie and Senator Davis were married.  So, Mrs. Davis, was now a widow, and Wharton Green was a widower.

A few years later, Mrs. Davis and Wharton Green married.  They were married for about 20 years, and it was a good marriage.  W. J. Green wrote complimentary of his wife in his biography.  Green died in 1910.  Tokay Vineyard no longer exists although there is a Fayetteville neighborhood and road by the name of Tokay still.  After her husband’s death, Mrs. Green had a home built in the Haymount area of Fayetteville.  The home still exists to this day.

The Steamer Governor Worth was sold and came to run on the Indian River beneath Jacksonville, FL for about 10 years.  As the railroad made its way further south through Florida, the need for water transportation waned.  The steamer was renamed the Rockledge, for the Florida town which was a terminus.

In 1888, President Grover Cleveland, his wife and entourage, came to Florida for the Sub-Tropical Exposition.  As part of his visit, President Cleveland rode aboard the Steamer Rockledge for a two-hours round trip.  Captain XXX sent to the White House, a case of Indian River oranges, for the President and his wife, and was thanked appropriately.

So, the Steamer Governor Worth had an interesting life, both upon the Cape Fear & as the Rockledge upon the Indian River.  But, recall that the Rockledge traveled along with the railroad crew acting as a floating hotel, and eventually was tied up at the Miami waterfront.  The Rockledge was used both as a hotel and a floating casino while docked at Miami.

By 1913, the Rockledge was just a rusting steel hull on the Miami shore.  In late 1913, the Rockledge was hauled several miles out into the Atlantic Ocean and sunk.  *Although there are copious records of the locations of Florida shipwrecks, there is no record for where the Rockledge was scuttled.

NOTE:  I am sure there are several omissions (XXX) and misinformation in the above article.  I wrote it quickly without going back to verify dates, ages, locations, names, etc.  But, having gotten the basic framework down, I hopefully will go back and make all the necessary corrections.

I think the story of David Davis should become a part of North Carolina history because he is “A Most Interesting Man.”  A contemporary of Abraham Lincoln.  Campaign manager for the Lincoln Campaign.  Executor for Lincoln’s Estate.  A US Supreme Court Justice.  A United States Senator.  President Pro Tempore of the Senate.  Acting Vice-President of the United States.  Second wealthiest man in Illinois at the time of this death.

 
Comments Off on A Judge, a Justice, a Governor, a Senator, a Vice-President & Several Presidents.

Posted by on August 14, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

The Eagle/Duck License Plate

eagle-duckIt is interesting that this stylized eagle has the illusion of incorporating a sleeping yellow duck as it’s bill.  And here is another that looks like a mad yellow duck.

eagle-mad-duck

 
Comments Off on The Eagle/Duck License Plate

Posted by on August 15, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

Bee Line to Place New Ferry Boat in Use on Christmas

Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 7:45 PM
To: Gibson, Bill
Subject: Bee Line to Place New Ferry Boat in Use on Christmas

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=xBtPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Bk4DAAAAIBAJ&dq=bee%20line%20ferry&pg=3622%2C3437344

 
Comments Off on Bee Line to Place New Ferry Boat in Use on Christmas

Posted by on November 25, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Bee Line Ferry – More WILMINGTON – PINELLAS Ferry Articles

NEW CREWS REPLACE STRICKERS
Ferry Service Resumed; ‘Normal Operations’ Expected At End Of Week By Port Authority

The month-old Bee Line ferry strike is broken.
Limited service, with one of three boats in Operation, was restored yesterday morning at 7:30 o’clock.
Manned by newly-recruited crews from all parts of the state, the smallest of the boats —the Pinellas— maintained a regular schedule throughout the day. A second boat will be placed in service this morning. Normal operations are expected to be restored by the end of the week.
E. Leslie Cole, chairman of the St. Petersburg Port Authority—operating agency of the ferry between St. Petersburg and Bradenton, personally supervised the first “sailing”. He expressed

St. Petersburg Times – Nov 12, 1946

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=m70wAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0E4DAAAAIBAJ&pg=7125%2C1686071

McNeely Takes Over Bee Line

Resignation of E. Roy Baldinger, manager of the Port Authority and head of the Bee Line ferry, was announced this morning by Walter E. Keyes, secretary-director of the state internal improvement commission. Baldinger has been with the commission as its St. Petersburg executive since the state took over the Tampa bay bridge project and the ferry system.
At the same time, Keyes announced appointment of Capt. E. Ray McNeely as successor to Baldinger. McNeely has been operating superintendent of the ferry line since the city acquired it. He had been with the old Bee Line ferry company since 1926 with the exception of the period from Mar. 1942 through Oct. 1945 during which he was with the U.S. Merchant marine. He returned on November ’45 to become cuperintendent for the city.
The Evening Independent – Aug 19, 1949 (Good picture of Baldinger, Keyes and McNeely. McNeely dies just 4 months and 10 days from this.)

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=UwNQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=g1UDAAAAIBAJ&pg=3622%2C6227388

Capt. McNeely Succeeds Baldinger as Port Manager

E. R. Baldinger yesterday resigned as Port Manager here for the Florida State Improvement Commission.
Commission Director Walter E. Keyes, who accepted the resignation “with regrets,” immediately appointed Capt. E. Ray McNeely to succeed Baldinger.
McNeely, a veteran ferry boat captain, has served for the past 21 years as superintendent of the Bee Line Ferry which is now operated by the Improvement Commission.
St. Petersburg Times – Aug 20, 1949
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Fs0KAAAAIBAJ&sjid=mU4DAAAAIBAJ&pg=4621%2C461039

Capt. Eugene Ray McNeely
Bee Line Ferry Head, Dies

Capt. Eugene Ray McNeely, 57, operator for the state of the Bee Line ferry and connected with it since 1927, died this morning at his home, 1440 Fifteenth street south, after a protracted illness.
Of a long line of Mississippi steamboat captains and operators, McNeely entered the service of the ferry, then privately owned, immediately on coming here from Natchez, Miss. Previously he had operated the McNeely ferry between Natchez and Vidalia, La. A family enterprise.
Capt. McNeely soon rose in the service of the ferry company and for nearly 20 years was its marine superintendent. When the ferry was purchased by the St. Petersburg Port authority as a part of the promotion of the lower bay bridge plan, he continued in

The Evening Independent – Dec 30, 1949

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=950&dat=19491230&id=VGhIAAAAIBAJ&sjid=gFUDAAAAIBAJ&pg=1807,2356377

Boats Made Beeline Across Tampa Bay
Fred Wright, Independent Reporter

Like the song says, on a clear day you can see forever – in this case, Manatee County from Pinellas.
Only about seven miles of water separate the two bodies of land.
For motorists, however, the land of Manatee was as far away from St. Petersburg — up to the 1920s — as if it had been half way across the state.
Now there’s the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, putting weekend vacationers and year-around tourists just a hop, skip and 50-cent toll apart from Pinellas and Manatee.
But up until the 1920s, the trip was formidable. To reach Manatee,
The Evening Independent – Oct 24, 1966

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=McFaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=R1cDAAAAIBAJ&pg=7190%2C4193474

 
Comments Off on Bee Line Ferry – More WILMINGTON – PINELLAS Ferry Articles

Posted by on November 25, 2014 in The Boats

 

Bee Line Ferry – WILMINGTON – PINELLAS Ferry

ANOTHER BOAT
FOR BAY FERRY

Pinellas-Piney Point Line to Have Big, New Craft About Nov. 1

A fine new large boat will be put into service on the Bee Line ferry service, between St. Petersburg’s Pinellas Point wharf and Piney Point by Nov. 1, according to announcement made Saturday by Charles L. Carter, president of the company.
The company has two boats for service on the ferry line across Tampa bay at this time, one of them “The Doty,” being in service during the slack summer period. “The Wilmington,” the second boat owned by the company and in service during the busy fall, winter and spring seasons, will be overhauled. Mr. Carter said, and converted into a more powerful and speedier craft. The steam boilers will be removed and a Diese[l] engine will be installed. It is expected that after the changes are made the Wilmington will cross Tampa bay in 25 minutes or less, carrying passengers, freight and motor cars.
The new highway between Piney Point and Palmetto in Manatee county, Mr. Carter said, will be completed in its new form of construction before the opening of the busy tourist season. The xxx spur from Piney Point to the xxx shore road is now reconstructed with a width of 20 feet. The xxx base is down, is rolled and trxxx is opened with the exception of about half a mile, which is provided with a good detour. One of the Bay shore road the surface is being xxx from the Palmetto end toward Piney Point. On the spur the surface will be a penetration asphalt over rolled shell.
The one boat in service now making five round trips a day xxx the ferry route. The new boat will go into service in time to provide a quick trip to Sarasota, winter headquarters for the Ringling Brothers circus, and a route also shorter by 47 miles to Palmetto, Manatee, Braedenton, Punta Gorda and For Myers.

St. Petersburg Times – Aug 5, 1928

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=gClPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=xk0DAAAAIBAJ&dq=pinellas%20ferry&pg=7196%2C1008615

FERRY LINE WILL START NEW BOAT SUNDAY MORNING

“PINELLAS” WILL MAKE MAIDEN TRIP TOMORROW FROM PINELLAS POINT LANDING

Effective tomorrow morning, the new boat “Pinellas” of the Bee Line Ferry will go into active service in the transporation of automobiles and passengers across Tampa bay between Pinellas and Piney Points. It is the first of several improvements in the service contemplated by officers of the company for the winter season of 1930-31.
The newly commissioned ferry boat was recently completed by the company in local shipyards. The boat is practically new throughout, except for a few pieces of plating, frame angle irons, floor plates, keel, main deck beams and the bulwark, representing less than 10 per cent of the structural work. All parts of the old “Wilmington” which were retained have been heavily re-enforced, although tests showed them to be in first class shape.
New equipment on the boat includes the engines, from bilge pumps, air compressor pumps, and dynamos to the 350 horsepower Atlas Imperial full Diesel; deck planking, tanks for both fuel and air, the electric lighting plant, all superstructure, steel enclosed sides, lifeboat deck, pilot house, funnel and siren.
The latter, officers of the company state, should be audible throughout St. Petersburg and over Tampa bay for a distance of miles, announcing the arrival of the “Pinellas” at Pinellas Point on the regular daily trips. The boat is [last line of article lost]
The Evening Independent – Nov 14, 1930

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=58xPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=n1QDAAAAIBAJ&dq=pinellas%20ferry&pg=1398%2C853270

City Supplies $185,000 to Buy Ferry.
Plan Permanenet Pinellas-manatee Link

St. Petersburg Times – Dec 20, 1944

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=BKFPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=wU4DAAAAIBAJ&dq=pinellas%20ferry&pg=7240%2C4072597

Council to Get New Proposal Providing Public Operation Of Ferry Within 30 Days

St. Petersburg Times – Nov 6, 1945

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=dxIwAAAAIBAJ&sjid=pE4DAAAAIBAJ&dq=pinellas%20ferry&pg=6675%2C817232

Bee Line Ferry Closes Tonight
[Temporary, 5 days, closing for repairs.]

St. Petersburg Times – Sep 7, 1947

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=7ltIAAAAIBAJ&sjid=3E4DAAAAIBAJ&dq=pinellas%20ferry&pg=3514%2C2541507

 
Comments Off on Bee Line Ferry – WILMINGTON – PINELLAS Ferry

Posted by on November 25, 2014 in The Boats

 

The USS Nantucket

USS Nantucket (Monitor Class)During the Spanish-American War (1898), the Civil War era, “Monitor” Class Battleship manned by Wilmingtonians and her Commander was George L. Morton.  His second in command was H. H. McIlhenny.  The vessel and her crew were sent to prepare for war near Beaufort, SC.  But, before she could enter into battle the Spanish-American War was over.  She was decommissioned and her crew returned to Wilmington, NC by train.  Someone once said that her crew had killed more of the enemy upon the steps of the Orton Hotel than aboard the battleship;-)  Spanish American War Navy 1898 Wilmington, NC (PDF)

–o–

USS Nantucket - Officers & Crew, Port Royal, SC 1898

USS Nantucket – Officers & Crew, Port Royal, SC 1898

I include the U.S.S. Nantucket as a Cape Fear Steamer because she was steam powered, and that George L. Morton was a distant relative.  In fact, my research regarding the paddlewheel steamers upon the Cape Fear was an indirect result of genealogical research that I had done on family members in the Wilmington, NC area.  While looking through old microfilm of Wilmington newspapers, I came across the article for the Great Fire of Wilmington (February 1886).  I read of the Steamer Bladen, and this piqued my interest in what a paddlewheel steamer might have been like on the Cape Fear river.

–o–

I had already done a great deal of research on George L. Morton and his brother-in-law, Jesse Wilder.  Both had been successful turpentine distillers.  Their business, originally at the corner of Brunswick and Nutt Streets, approximately where the current Wilmington Convention Center is now located.  Jesse Wilder had for a few years moved, with his wife Fannie, to Brunswick, GA and had a successful turpentine distillery there also, but after her unexpected death while visiting relatives in Wilmington, he returned to Wilmington shortly thereafter.  She is buried in the Mount Lebanon Church Cemetery next to Airlie Gardens.  Her grave marker is made of zinc.  Jesse is buried in Bellevue Cemetery near his father and the George L. Morton family plots.

While Jesse Wilder was in Brunswick, GA, George L. Morton had briefly partnered with B. F. Hall in the turpentine distilling business, but had parted amicably.  Benjamin Franklin Hall had then partnered with Oscar Pearsall, their business headquartered approximately at Brunswick & Nutt Streets.

Hall & Pearsall - WaterLand Depot Letterhead

Hall & Pearsall – WaterLand Depot Letterhead

Geo. L. Morton Co. - Nov. 1893

Geo. L. Morton Co. – Nov. 1893

Hall & Pearsall Receipt Letterhead

Hall & Pearsall Receipt Letterhead

Hall & Pearsall WaterLand Depot Postcard

Hall & Pearsall WaterLand Depot Postcard

NOTE:  During the Wilmington Race Riots, a “rapid fire” gun was mounted on a horse drawn wagon and moved about town.  I do not have proof of the following, but because of the timing of events (USS Nantucket decommissioned at end of Spanish-American War, Wilmington Race Riots), that the “rapid fire” weapon was probably one that had been aboard the battleship, and those using it had probably learned how during their training for war.

Geo. L. Morton was to lead the 1888 Wilmington Marine Parade because he owned the smallest steam vessel, the Vertner.

After his turpentine business, Geo. L. Morton worked for the Galena-Signal Oil Company eventually becoming a regional executive.  He had his own train car and moved his family to Atlanta, GA.  H. H. McIlhenny, his second in command aboard the U.S.S. Nantucket, became his assistant and was with him until the time of Geo. L.’s death in 1930.

 
Comments Off on The USS Nantucket

Posted by on July 31, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

The Steamer HIGHLANDER

From Wednesday’s Daily.
THE CITY OF FAYETTEVILLE
—–
Arrived Here This Morning
—–

[STEAMER ILLUSTRATION GOES HERE]

The City of Fayetteville has arrived. This much talked of and anxiously expected boat drew up at her splendid new dock this morning at 9 o’clock.
President Lisman and Mrs. Lisman, General Manager Cooke and Secretary S. H. MacRae made the initial trip up the Cape Fear on the steamer.

A great number of people have visited the boat today, and everyone was delighted and surprised at her magnificence.
The hoisting machinery and alpine cars of the dock work splendidly, and there were few too timid to make the delightful descent and ascent on these novel cars. Comfortable steps also lead from the wharf to the steamer’s side, but only a few preferred them to the cars.

The City of Fayetteville left Jacksonville, Fla., on Christmas Eve, and reached Wilmington Sunday.

She left Wilmington yesterday morning, and steamed leisurely up the Cape Fear, attracting much attention at each landing place, where crowds had assembled to greet the new boat. The boat’s journey from Florida was a most interesting one, but not without its drawbacks:

The tug towing her broke down and was obliged to give up the trip at Charleston. The tug Cecilia was chartered at Charleston and she sailed with her on December 30th. That night the weather forced them into Georgetown harbor and there they waited for favorable weather. She crossed the Georgetown bar at noon Saturday. When about 20 miles out a thick fog settled over the ocean and the wind shifted around to the southeast and began blowing a small gale. The sea soon became very rough. The conditions were most unfavorable for a boat of the City of Fayetteville’s class and considerable uneasiness was felt. It was decided that the best thing to do was to keep on the trip. The Fayetteville got up steam and worked her wheel at full speed, which steadied her. After a very stormy run they crossed the Cape Fear bar at 10 o’clock Saturday night without a mishap.

The City of Fayetteville was built by the Merrill-Stevens Engineering Company, at Jacksonville, Fla., for the Fayetteville & Wilmington steamboat Company, and was launched last spring. She is undoubtedly one of the handsomest river boats in southern waters, and is probably better equipped and will be more luxuriously furnished than any river boat south of the Potomac.
The officers of the Fayetteville & Wilmington Steamboat Company are:

President, A. A. Lisman, of New York.
Vice-President and General Manger, E. W. Cooke, of Fayetteville.
Secretary, S. H. MacRae, of Fayetteville.
Treasurer, John K. Strange, of Fayetteville.
The steamer’s officers are:
Captain, H. B. Fromberger.
Mate, E. Nelson.
First Engineer, L. L. Moses.
Second Engineer, J. H. Mawdesley.

The purser and stewardess are yet to be selected. Besides the officers, the boat’s crew will consist of 2 pilots, 2 firemen, 2 cooks, 4 waiters, 4 deck hands and a stewardess.
The new boat is 140 feet long, 30 feet wide and draws only 16 inches of water light.

The saloon deck has 14 first-class state rooms, with sleeping accommodations for 30 upper and 20 lower cabin passengers. All the state rooms open on promenade decks 6 feet wide and extending two-thirds around the boat. On this deck are the dining room; smoking room; ladies cabin; ladies’ and gentlemen’s toilets; purser’s room and stewardess’ room.
On the lower or main deck are two after rooms for colored passengers; two rooms for deck passengers, one for men and the other for women, with folding beds; crew’s quarters in the forecastle for 12 men; engine and boiler rooms forward and the engines cased in the after part; a freight room 30×50 feet, with a large space on the bow.

She has an electric light plant, supplying 120 incandescent lights distributed all over the boat, and a 13-inch electric searchlight. Her wheel is 12 feet in diameter, with 45 revolutions per minute, giving a speed of over 12 miles an hour on 150 pounds of steam.

General Manager Cooke says the boat’s schedule will be as follows:

Leave Wilmington Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings, arriving Fayetteville the morning following, and leave Fayetteville Monday, Wednesday and Friday nights, arriving Wilmington the next morning. She will lay over in Wilmington Saturdays and Sundays to run excursions on the river. She will stop for passengers at the principal points along the river. She will carry through freight to a large extent, and will be run in connection with the Clyde Line and Merchants & Farmers Steamboat Company, of which the Highlander is the principal boat. Mr. T. D. Love will be her agent in Wilmington.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, January 8, 1903]


A TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENT.
—–
Between Three Boat Lines.
—–

The three steamboat lines that ply the Cape Fear between Fayetteville and Wilmington, to-wit: The Cape Fear and Peoples Company, of which Col. W. S. Cook is General Manager, which owns the Hurt and Hawes; The Merchants & Farmers Steamboat Company, of which Mr. Oliver Evans is President, which owns the Highlander and Driver; and The Fayetteville and Wilmington Steamboat Company, which owns the “City of Fayetteville,” of which Mr. A. A. Lisman is President, and Mr. E. W. Cooke General Manager, have formed a traffic arrangement; and Col. W. S. Cook has been made the agent at Fayetteville, and Mr. T. D. Love the agent at Wilmington for the three lines.

There was a meeting Friday of the stockholders of the Fayetteville and Wilmington Steamboat Company, at which the following stockholders were present: Messrs. H. W. Lilly, W. L. Holt, W. M. Morgan, R. P. Gray, A. A. Lisman, S. H. MacRae, L. A. Williamson, E. H. Williamson and E. W. Cooke.

The meeting was for the purpose of reviewing the financial condition of the company, and to take preliminary steps for the operation of the line, pending the annual meeting of stockholders in February.

Under the new arrangement all the boats of the several lines will use the splendid new wharf of the Fayetteville and Wilmington Steamboat Company.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, January 15, 1903]


The Body Found.
Just before Xmas the OBSERVER contained an account of the drowning from the steamer Highlander of an unknown man between here and Wilmington. Friday the body was found floating near the “Dram Tree” two miles below Wilmington. The body was identified as that of Isaac Kelland, a negro who either jumped or fell overboard from the steamer Highlander, about 40 miles up the Cape Fear river, Monday before last Christmas. On the negroe’s body were found bills for goods purchased in Wilmington and a pint bottle of whisky, pretty well emptied.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday February 19, 1903]


THE RIVER TRAFFIC.
—–
Sixth Annual Meeting Yesterday
of Merchants’ and Farmers’
Steamboat Company.
—–
UNDER ONE MANAGEMENT.
—–
in Future All Lines, Except City of Fayetteville, Will Be Operated Conjointly—New Light Draught Steamer Being Built Here—Notes.
—–

The sixth annual meeting of the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Company was held at the general offices in this city upon the arrival of the steamer Highlander yesterday. Mr. Oliver Evans, of Fayetteville, president, and Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, secretary and treasurer and general manager of the company, were the officers present.

The general discussion of the business of the past year, which was entirely satisfactory, was indulged in and all the old officers were re-elected unanimously. The company operates the steamer Highlander between Wilmington and Fayetteville and now has in process of construction a new boat of light draught and good freight capacity to be known as the Tar Heel. She is being built near foot of Chesnut street and will be admirably adapted to the Cape Fear traffic.

One of the most important announcements as a result of the meeting yesterday was that the steamers Hurt and Highlander and E. A. Hawes and Tar Heel will continue to be operated under one management, notwithstanding the withdrawl of the City of Fayetteville, against which the Merchants’ and Farmers’ and Cape Fear Steamboat companies most emphatically claim there was no discrimination.

Mr. T. D. Love will be general freight agent here of the Hurt, Highlander, Tar Heel and Hawes, the latter being employed on the Northeast and Black river lines, and Col. W. S. Cook will be general freight agent for the steamers at Fayetteville. Mr. James Madden, who was formerly general agent here for the Hurt and Hawes, becomes chief clerk to General Manager Love.

All the steamers land at Mr. Love’s wharf, nearly opposite the rear of the Front street market house, though the company still retains possession of the wharf, next south of the foot of Chesnut street. The new arrangement promises exceedingly well. Schedules will be strictly adhered to as far as possible and the freight office will remain open until 4 P. M. of each steamer day.

[Wilmington Star – February 27, 1903]

Steamboat Speed on the Cape Fear.
—–
Correspondence of the Observer

MR. EDITOR:
An extract from the Star, copied into the OBSERVER last Thursday, says that the “Highlander’s” run from Fayetteville to Wilmington in twelve hours “breaks the record, ancient and modern.” What do Captains Worth and Garrason say to that? The Steamer Murchison made the trip in 1869 in nine hours and twenty minutes and the Hurt made it in exactly nine hours—making all her regular mail stops. I have been told by old river men that the Zephyr used to make the run in eight hours. The truth is old Fayetteville was in some respects ahead of “the New South.” Before Sherman came along she had nearly a dozen cotton factories in and near town. And how many of her younger people know that steamers ran from Wilmington to Lockville in Chatham county, fifty miles above Fayetteville, and that she had street cars and water works two generations ago?
“A FORTY-NINER.”

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, April 9, 1903]

LOCAL DOTS.

— Fayetteville Observer: “ Deputy U. S. Collector Sam King, of Elizabethtown, and Mr. Castine Martin, of White Oak, who comes to visit his son, Mr. A. E. Martin, were passengers on the Highlander which arrived last evening. Mr. King succeeded Mr. Sutton as deputy collector and the latter succeeded Mr. King as postmaster at Elizabethtown. “

[Wilmington Morning Star — Sunday, May 17, 1903]


“ Tar Heel “ in Commission.
The “ Tar Heel, “ the new steamer recently built in this city by the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Co., of which Mr. T. D. Love is general manager, cleared yesterday for her initial trip to Fayetteville, taking the run of the “ Highlander, “ which remains in port. The new steamer, while not so large as the “ Highlander, “ is a model boat for the river trade and by reason of her construction is able to navigate in very shallow water. Capt. Robeson and crew of the “ Highlander “ were transferred here to the “ Tar Heel. “

—–

Change of Masters.
The steamer “ City of Fayetteville “ and “ Highlander “ were in port yesterday. Capt. A. H. Worth has resigned as master of the first named steamer and has been succeeded by Capt. Jeff Bradshaw, of the “ Highlander. “ Capt. William Robeson succeeds Capt. Bradshaw in command of the “ Highlander. “

—–

New Wilmington Steamer.
Mr. W. A. Rourk has returned from Norfolk and Washington, where he and Capt. W. A. Sanders looked at several steamers, with a view to the purchase of one for the Wilmington and Little River Transportation Company. They found a boat that suited them, but were not empowered to make any deal. A meeting of the directors of the company will be held this week to decide upon the matter. Capt. Sanders returned via Beaufort, N. C., his old home.

[Wilmington Morning Star — Thursday, May 28, 1903]


The “Tar Heel” Coming.
The Wilmington Star of Thursday says:
The “Tar Heel,” the new steamer recently built in this city by the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Co., of which Mr. T. D. Love is general manager, cleared yesterday for her initial trip to Fayetteville, taking the run of the “Highlander,” which remains in port. The new steamer, while not so large as the “Highlander,” is a model boat for the river trade and by reason of her construction is able to navigate in very shallow water. Capt. Robeson and crew of the “Highlander” were transferred here to the “Tar Heel.”

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, June 4, 1903]

River News.
The Wilmington Star of recent date says:
The steamer “Highlander” of the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Co., of which Mr. T. D. Love is general manager, is now laid up at her wharf in
this city for the installation of an electric lighting plant. The apparatus is furnished by a Michigan concern and will be complete and up-to-date in every respect.

[The Fayetteville Observer – June 11, 1903.]

 

An Exciting Race.
The Wilmington Messenger of this Tuesday says:
An exciting river race is reported as having taken place Friday between the steamers Highlander and the City of Fayetteville, resulting in a victory for the former. The two steamers left Wilmington on the up river trip in the afternoon at 4 o’clock and at Roans’ Landing, twenty-one miles from the city, where a stop was made for wood, the two craft got side by side and the race commenced. Each was light and made about the same number of stops, so the race was an equal one. For fully fifteen miles the steamers were in sight of each other, but finally the Highlander steamed away from the City of Fayetteville and made Fayetteville ten minutes ahead of her adversary.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, July 16, 1903]


SINKING OF THE TAR HEEL
—–
Lighter Carried to the Scene by the
City of Fayetteville – Cargo Landed
Without Loss.
—–

The steamer City of Fayetteville, which arrived yesterday from Fayetteville, brought news from the scene of the sinking of the Tar Heel at Old Court House Landing, sixty miles from here. It appears that the Tar Heel only sank about five feet as the depth of the water was very shallow at the spot where the accident happened and consequently none of the cargo was damaged, as it was all above deck. The accident was due to hole being “stove” in the bottom of the boat by a floating log.

The City of Fayetteville towed a lighter to receive the cargo, which had in the meantime been landed safely and without loss. From last reports the Tar Heel was still above water, though disabled, and will be saved unless the rise in the river wrecks her. The steamer Highlander, which left here Friday, with General Manager T. D. Love, of the Merchants’ and Farmers’ Steamboat Company, aboard, has by now arrived on the scene. The Tar Heel belonged to the company mentioned
The steamer Hurt, which both arrived and left here yesterday, was near the Landing when the accident occurred.

——-

STEAMER TAR HEEL SUNK.
—–
Accident at Court House Landing.
After Neary {misspelled} Fifty Years.
—–
(Special to The Messenger.)

Fayetteville, N. C., September 19. – It was about 2:30 o’clock yesterday when Mr. Frank Glover, the agent, received news of the sinking of the Steamer Tar Heel on her upward trip at Court House Landing, about thirty-four miles from this city. The details, up to this writing are meager, and it is not known whether a log or a rock in the steamer at that point broke into the steamer’s keel. Mr. Glover dispatched a light as soon as possible to take off the cargo; and, as the water was low, the hull only, not the decks, went under. There was a rise of three or four feet in the river last night, but if the unloading was accomplished before the rise reached the point, the cargo can be saved. It consisted of general merchandise, among other things 25,000 pounds of lard for the Armfield Company. The Tar Heel was a wooden boat, built last spring, mainly for the freighting business…

[Wilmington Messenger — September 20, 1903]

 

About the Sinking of the Tar Heel.

The steamer Highlander arrived yesterday morning from the scene of the accident to the steamer Tar Heel, at Old Court House Landing, and left again in the afternoon, carrying back two lighters to use in floating the disabled vessel. President T. D. Love came down on the Highlander and returned with her.
The cargo of the Tar Heel was carried safely to Fayeeteville {misspelled} on a lighter.

[Wilmington Messenger – September 22, 1903]


NEW STEAMBOAT COMPANY
HAS BEEN ORGANIZED.
——
Steamers City of Fayetteville, Highlander
and Hurt Under One Control.
——

The South Atlantic Transit Company has been formed, an has secured control of the Merchants’ and Farmers, Cape Fear and Fayetteville and Wilmington Steamboat companies. This gives the new company control of the steamers City of Fayetteville, Highlander and A. P. Hurt, the best steamers on the river.
The new line went into effect today. The South Atlantic Transit Company is composed of Messrs. A. A. Lisman, of New York; Duncan McEachern and T. D. Love, of Wilmington, and W. S. Cook, of Fayetteville.

Mr. Love is general agent at Wilmington, and Mr. W. S. Cook general agent at Fayetteville.

All the boats of the company are tied up on account of low water. The river is lower now than it has been in two years, there being only about a foot of water at Fayetteville.

The City of Fayetteville is tied up here, the Highlander at Fayetteville, and the Hurt at Court House Falls.

The company will operate only two steamers on a regular schedule.

Yesterday’s Fayetteville Observer has this to say of the deal:
Tomorrow the South Atlantic Transit Company, recently incorporated under the laws of New York, will assume charge of the steamboat traffic on the Cape Fear between Fayetteville and Wilmington.

This company has leased the following steamers: The A. P. Hurt, of the Peoples and Cape Fear Steamboat Company; The Highlander, of the Farmers’ and Merchants Steamboat Co.; and the City of Fayetteville, of the Fayetteville and Wilmington Steamboat Co. These three boats are the pick of the Cape Fear river fleet, with the exception of the Tar Heel, recently built. What disposition will be made of the Tar Heel and the Hawes, which boats are owned by two of the above companies, we are not yet able to say.

Col. W. S. Cook is the general freight and passenger agent of the new company, and Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, is superintendent of transportation.

[Wilmington Dispatch – October 1, 1903]

The steamer Tar Heel, which went to the bottom several weeks ago, was raised and brought down under her own steam. She is on the marine railway.

[Wilmington Dispatch — October 13, 1903]

 

River News.
The Wilmington Messenger says:
The recent merger of steamboat interests, or consolidation of the lines of steamers plying between here and Fayetteville is to mean a new schedule and one less regular boat. As soon as the water in the river gets another rise the new schedule will go into effect. Heretofore the interests represented in the consolidation had a boat every day on the river either going to Fayetteville or coming from there here. Now one of these boats will be taken out of the schedule and it will be the steamer Hurt. There will be four boats per week each way and these trips will be made by the steamers City of Fayetteville and Highlander. The former will adhere to her own schedule of leaving Wilmington Tuesdays and Saturdays, and the latter will be changed so as to depart Mondays and Thursdays. The Hurt will not be included in the schedule, but will be held in reserve.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, October 15, 1903]


NEW STEAMBOAT LINE.
—–
Company Formed To Compete For
Upper Cape Fear Traffic.
—–

A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown. The stockholders are leading men of that place. The chief promoter and principal stockholder is Mr. A. E. Martin, of Fayetteville, who will be the general agent.

A line of boats will be operated on the upper Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company, which is now operating four steamers on the river, viz: City of Fayetteville, Highlander, Hurt and E. A. Hawes.

At a meeting of the directors of the new company in Elizabethtown Wednesday morning it was decided to purchase the steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city. The sale will be confirmed in Wilmington next Monday and the steamer will be put on a schedule by the new company. The Tar Heel is a comparatively new boat. She is 100 feet long, 20 feet wide and is considered the lightest draught boat on the river. The purchase price has not been made public but we understand the new company got a good trade. The name of the Wilmington agent for the line has not been announced.

[Wilmington Dispatch – January 22, 1904]

 

New Steamboat Line for the River.
Says the Wilmington Dispatch:
A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown. The stockholders are leading men of that place. The chief promoter and principal stockholder is Mr. A. E. Martin, of Fayetteville, who will be the general agent.

A line of boats will be operated on the upper Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company, which is now operating four steamers on the river, viz: City of Fayetteville, Highlander, Hurt and E. A. Hawes.

At a meeting of the directors of the new company in Elizabethtown Wednesday morning it was decided to purchase the steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city. The sale will be confirmed in Wilmington next Monday and the steamer will be put on a schedule by the new company. The Tar Heel is a comparatively new boat. She is 100 feet long, 20 feet wide and is considered the lightest draught boat on the river. The purchase price has not been made public but we understand the new company got a good trade. The name of the Wilmington agent for the line has not been announced.

Says the Wilmington correspondent of the Raleigh Post:
A new steamboat company was organized this week at Elizabethtown, N. C. Mr. E. A. Martin, of Fayetteville, is the principal stockholder and general agent. The company will operate a line of steamers on the Cape Fear river between Wilmington and Fayetteville in competition with the South Atlantic Company. The new company has purchased the Steamer Tar Heel from Mr. T. D. Love, of this city. The line will be in operation next week.

It was officially announced that Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, the well known steamboat man, will operate a line of steamers on the Santee and Congaree rivers between Georgetown and Columbia, S. C., a distance of two hundred miles. This is one of the most important river transportation ventures ever made in the Carolinas. The new line will open up one of the best farming sections of South Carolina, besides giving Columbia an all water route to New York, using the Clyde Line, which runs to Georgetown. It will also give a water route from Charleston to Columbia via Georgetown. The business men of Columbia, feeling that the railroad rates on freight are excessive, started the movement to establish an all water line and have guaranteed Mr. Love a large tonnage. The new line will be in operation in two weeks. Steamers from the Cape Fear river fleet will be used on the Georgetown and Columbia line.

—–

Is This Our “Highlander?”
Under the head “The Sale of the ‘Highlander”” the Wilmington Star quotes the following from the Columbia (S. C.) State:
* * *
Secretary Watson of the Chamber of Commerce stated last night that the $12,000 steamer to be used on the line, between Columbia and Georgetown, is now being caulked and braced and made ready for her ocean trip in tow down the coast, and that this work will be completed by the end of the week. The steamer will take the ocean from the port of Southport, N. C., at once, provided weather conditions are favorable.

Already many applications are being made by business houses who wish the distinction of bringing in the first cargo. It is probable that the boat will come up to Columbia on her maiden trip, loaded with a cargo of steel from Pittsburg.

For the present at least and possibly for a year this steamer and others, if the business warrants it, will be operated to steamship connections at Georgetown.

The boat with which the Capital City will become an inland port is a handsome one, of 130 tons burden, capable of carrying 175 bales of cotton between decks, or 1,000 bags of guano. Her machinery is entirely new, carrying a 150 horse power marine boiler of 150 pounds pressure. She is a stern wheel steamer, 140 feet in length over all and 26 feet beam. Her draft is only 23 inches. On the upper deck are the captain’s office, the drug room, the steward’s quarters, four large staterooms and accommodations for 65 passengers. The rate of speed is 10 miles an hour against stream. At present the steamer bears the name “Highlander,” but this will be changed. The line will be operated by men of long experience in river navigation, and all freight traffic will be quoted by those who have made river navigation matters a specialty for many years, thus avoiding all the troubles that would naturally come from inexperience.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, January 28, 1904]

 

New Boat for Georgetown.
Columbia, January 27. – The final agreement between the river and inland route steamboat syndicate of the South Atlantic coast and the committee of river navigation of the Columbia Chamber of Commerce, acting or the business men of Columbia, have been concluded for the opening of river navigation of the Congaree River and the operation of a line of boats. When the representatives of the syndicate left here last week he carried with him the agreement. He wired on Saturday that it had been formally accepted by his company.

Secretary Watson, of the Chamber of Commerce, said to-night that the $12,000 steamer, to be used on this line between Columbia and Georgetown, is now being caulked and braced and made ready for her ocean trip in tow down the coast, and that this work will be completed by the end of the present week. The steamer will take the open ocean from the port of Southport, N. C., at once, provided weather conditions are such as to permit of her doing so.

Already many applications are being made by business houses who wish the distinction of being in the first cargo. It is probably that the boat will come up to Columbia on her maiden trip loaded with a cargo of steel goods from Pittsburg.

For the present, at least, and possibly for a year, this steamer and others, if the business warrants it, will b e operated only to steamship connections at Georgetown.

The committee on navigation has on foot, however, a plan looking to the extension of the line to the port of Charleston, provided Charleston does her part. This would mean the operation of a fast steel ocean-going steamer from Charleston to the mouth of the Santee River, where freight would be transferred to the lighter steamers for the Congaree haul.

In the next ten days all efforts will be concentrated upon the completion of wharf transfer and steamthip {misspelled} traffic arrangements, which are already under way. The Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce will probably have to visit several important Eastern points in the prosecution of this work in the next week.

The Government steamer charged with keeping the Santee and Congaree rivers in condition is now on its way from Georgetown to Columbia and is expected to reach Gramby {is this supposed to be Granby?} some day this week {period missing}

The boat by which the Capital will become an inland port is a hannsome {misspelled} one of 130 tons burden, capable of carrying, for instance, 175 bales of cotton between decks or 1,000 bags of guano. Her machinery is entirely new; carrying a 150 horse power marine boiler of 150 pounds pressure. She is a stern wheel steamer 140 feet in length over all and 26 feet beam. Her draft is only 23 inches. On her deck are the captain’s office, the drug room, the steward’s quarters, four large state rooms and accommodations for 75 passengers. Her speed is ten miles an hour against stream. At present the steamer bears the name “Highlander,” but this will be changed.

The line will be operated by men of long experience in river navigation, and all freight tariffs will be quoted by those who have made river navigation matters a specialty for many years, thus avoiding all of the troubles that would naturally come from inexperience.

All the details of plans for the operation of a river line have been carefully worked out and when it is put in regular operation a few weeks hence it will begin upon the basis of an established line. Secretary Watson is endeavoring to arrange to take a party of leading business men of the city down at least to the mouth of the Congaree on an opening outing, the trip to be taken a few days after the boat reaches Columbia.

[The Sunday Outlook – Georgetown, SC – January 30, 1904]

 

—The river steamer “Highlander” will go on the ways at Skinner’s Thursday, preparatory to being taken around to her new port of Columbia, S. C. The “Wilmington” goes on the ways Monday and it was impossible to get the “Highlander” ahead of her.

[Wilmington Star – January 31, 1904]

 

— The river steamer “Tar Heel” has been delivered to the new company at Elizabethtown, which recently purchased the boat.

[?? – January 31, 1904]

Highlander Off the Ways.
The steamer “Highlander” came off the ways at Skinner’s yesterday and her cabin is being braced now, preparatory to the sea trip around to the river and up to Columbia, S. C., from which point she will be operated. It is not known when the steamer will be transferred to her new home port as much depends on the weather.

[Wilmington Star? – February 15, 1904]

HIGHLANDER’S DEPARTURE
Steamer Will Sail For Georgetown
Sunday, Weather Being Good.
If the weather is favorable, the steamer Highlander will sail from Southport about midnight Sunday for Georgetown. The steamer Sanders will be her convoy down the coast. The Highlander will make the trip to Georgetown in twelve or fifteen hours. The boat will be in charge of Capt. J. C. Smith, with Capt. W. A. Snell as coast pilot. Mr. T. D. Love, the owner, will accompany the steamer. The Highlander will go direct to Columbia from Georgetown without any delay. The boat will be used in the new line to be operated between those cities.

[Wilmington Dispatch – February 20, 1904]

 

COLUMBIA TO GEORGETOWN.
—–
Two Boats Will Run Between Capital City
and our Port in a Short Time.
—–
It is quite probable that two boats will be plying the Congaree before the yellow jasmine throws its perfume over the banks of the turbid stream which will carry the vessel of commerce from Columbia to Georgetown. It is just a matter of whether or not the receipts of the boat line justify the addition of a second boat, for the “Highlander” will soon be ready for its mission.

Mr. E. J. Watson, secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, has assurance that the accommodation of an additional steamer will be supplied whenever the business justifies it. The scarcity of freight cars has been an annoyance for months, but it appears that shippers will not be troubled with a scarcity of steamers.

The first steamer of commerce to ply the waters between Columbia and Georgetown is expected this week. Mr. E. J. Watson, secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, has received advice to the effect that the new boat has been made ready for the coastwise tug from Wilmington to Georgetown. It is stated that the “Highlander” will be towed to Georgetown by the steamer “Sanders.” Capt. J. C. Smith will be master of the “Highlander” and Capt. W. A. Snell will be coast pilot for the trip around to Georgetown. Mr. T. D. Love, manager of the Wilmington and Fayetteville lines, will accompany the steamer around to the new company.

The Wilmington Star says: Capt. J. C. Smith, who has been engaged to take the steamer “Highlander” around to Columbia, S. C., will be captain of the “Highlander” on her run from Columbia to points on the Congaree, Wateree and Santee rivers. Capt. Smith is a veteran steamboat master and his selection for the new line is a good one.”

Capt. J. C. Tamplet of the snag boat “Great Pee Dee,” spent yesterday in the city, as his boat was tied up at the “wharf” at Gramby {Granby?} on account of yesterday being a holiday. The river was up 10 feet and steadily rising. On his recent trip on the river when the stream was at its lowest point in many months, Capt. Tamplet reports that his boat encountered no difficulty, although it has a draught of three and one half feet. The propeller struck against a submerged log once and this was the only trouble on the entire trip. He thinks the river easily navigable by boats the size of the “Highlander” and is annoyed by only one thing – the big freshets of recent years have washed away the banks and have covered submerged logs with sand. When he attempts to raise the logs the efforts are attended with great trouble for the ends of the logs break off. However, he is getting the bed of the stream in much better condition than when he started to work some time ago. –
Columbia State. {SC newspaper}

[The Sunday Outlook – Georgetown, SC – February 27, 1904]

 

THE HIGHLANDER SAILED.
—–
River Steamer Proceeded Down the
Coast, Bound For Georgetown
—–
After a succession of delays due to adverse weather conditions and other causes, the steamer Highlander passed over the bar at 8.40 o’clock this morning bound for Georgetown, S. C., whence she will proceed to Columbia on the Santee and Congaree rivers. The boat is expected to arrive at Georgetown by 4 o’clock this afternoon. The steamer Sanders accompanied her as far as Little river. The weather and the sea were perfect for the trip.

Mr. T. D. Love, the owner, is on the Highlander and will accompany her to Columbia. He will be the manager of the new line between Columbia and Georgetown.

[Wilmington Dispatch – March 10, 1904]

 

“The Highlander,” the new boat to run between Columbia and Georgetown, arrived in the city yesterday afternoon at 5.30. She is at the dock in rear of the opera house.

[The Sunday Outlook – Georgetown, SC – Saturday Night March 12, 1904]

 

THE HIGHLANDER
“IN PORT” AT LAST.
—–
Had a Successful, but Somewhat
Hazardous Trip.
—–
THE RIVER EXAMINED CAREFULLY
—–
Whistle of Columbia’s First Steamer
Of Commerce Was Sounded at
“Old Granby” Last Night.
—–

The Highlander is here. It was a hard trip, but was made without accident. After leaving Georgetown the boat was in motion but 35 hours, covering a distance of 212 miles, at the rate of six miles an hour up stream. Considering the many disadvantages, the trip was made in short time. The Highlander carried but a small cargo as the manager of the boat line, Mr. T. D. Love, declined to handle much freight on the initial trip. His boat draws 23 inches without any cargo, and he did not want to take any risks the first time up the river.

It was Thursday night when the boat left Georgetown with the ears of the crew ringing with the cheerful prediction of the people of the lumber city that the boat would never reach Columbia. And it was a hazardous trip – but the boat is here, having not once encountered unsuccessfully those hidden dangers of which warning had been given. The delays commenced as soon as Georgetown was left. Crossing the Winyah bay, eight miles from Georgetown, the Highlander entered the government canal which leads from the bay to the Santee river – for the city of Georgetown is 13 miles from the Santee and it is only by the use of this canal that boats can go from Columbia to the coast city.

It was in this canal that the dredge was found grounded, and the Highlander’s course was impeded until the tide came in and the dredge got off. The canal has sufficient water to float boats of considerable draught, but the dredge was grounded unaccountably. Friday morning the Highlander got under way again and made good time up the Santee, although the trip was made more trying because the Wateree river is on a boom and a rise of 15 feet was encountered in the Santee some miles below the mouth of the Wateree.

The trip was made slowly, as much with the view to locating landings and places at which to buy wood as to avoid possible obstructions. Down near the Northeastern bridge the smokestacks of the Louise were found sticking out of the water. Mr. Love had been offered an option on the sunken river steamer which had been plying the Santee for a distance of 100 miles up the stream, but he knows nothing of her machinery and her hull is 20 years old, so he did not purchase the stranded Louise.

The Hidden Dangers.
The voyage was without incident except for the fact that hundreds of “sinkers” were encountered, and the boat had to be guided around them. It is this which makes the channel hazardous. The snag boat Pee Dee had removed many such obstructions, and the only suggestion which is offered by the crew of the Highlander is that the coves along the shore should be kept clear of debris, for in making a bend in the river the prow of the boat is sometimes thrust into these coves, and the obstructions should be removed.

The “sinkers” are logs from trees which had been tapped for turpentine. One end of such a log is heavier than the other and sinks into the water. The lighter end frequently is carried below the surface of the water and remains a menace to boats coming up stream. For should they run across this impediment with one end wedged into the mud in the bottom of the river, the boat’s bottom might be ruined. It was in avoiding hidden dangers such as these that the skipper of the Highlander ran his boat very slowly.
Last night at 6 o’clock Mr. E. J. Watson received a telegram from Fort Motte announcing that the Highlander had passed through the draw bridge near there at noon yesterday. Accompanied by a party of Columbians Mr. Watson drove to the landing back of the Granby mill which is used by the government people who are building the dam across the river. No boat was there. The party walked out on the coffer dam which extends half way across the river and inspected the work which has been done by the government.

The Government Works.
The locks on the Lexington side of the river have been completed at a cost of a quarter of a million dollars, and half of the permanent dam has been completed – starting from the Lexington side. The coffer dam for the construction of the remaining half of the permanent dam has been finished, or will be this week, and the entire dam will be intact by the 1st of July. The coffer dam is an immense circular basin surrounding the place upon which the permanent dam will be erected, and keeps the river out while the masons are at work.

As soon as the dam is finished the Highlander will be able to come into the locks and to float up the river to the foot of Senate street, where the wharf will be located. For the present the landing at old Granby will used and the cargo will be brought into the city on drays. The agency of the dam will be to deepen the water between that point and Gervais street in order that boats may pass over the boulders in the bed of the stream. However, the dam will be constructed with due regard to the canal, and the water power of that agency of manufactures will not be affected.

While examining the work on the dams the party from Columbia observed a light far off down the river. The watchman declared this to be fishermen out on the stream, but presently there was a noise unmistakably that of a steamer, and for an hour the lights were watched eagerly as they swung closer to the city. First there was one tiny speck, then two, and finally the signal light was seen clearly, and then the outline of the boat from bow to stern. The Highlander stopped several hundred yards down the river from the dam and tied up at the landing at old Granby – one of the forgotten towns of South Carolina, a place once populous, now as deserted as is Hamburg, once Augusta’s competitor.

As there is a broad creek between the government works and the old Granby landing the visitors from the city engaged the services of a boatman and went down the river in a skiff to be the first to board the boat of which so much is expected in behalf of Columbia’s upbuilding.

The Highlander a New Boat.
The Highlander is a new boat, built in November, 1901, and every day that she has been in service she has been handled by the veteran river master, Capt. Jas. C. Smith, who has seen 32 years’ service on inland waterways, and yet is willing to admit that he does not know all about river channels. However, his successful trip with the Highlander adds to his fame as a river captain, and he has brought the boat through in great shape. It is over a month since the steamer left Wilmington, having been tied up at Southport for nearly three weeks waiting for the Atlantic ocean to offer a favorable opportunity for the run down the coast to Georgetown. With Capt. Smith are the following officers of the crew: LeRoy Smith, mate; James Peeples, chief mate and F. T. Gaskill, ship carpenter. Mr. Gaskill is the builder of the boat, and Capt. Smith declares it to be the sturdiest river craft he has ever managed in his 32 years of navigation. The hull is four inches in thickness and will stand a lot of hard knocks.

Henry Izard, a colored pilot, came with the boat and showed the way to Columbia, for he has made the trip before with government tugs. Mr. Leroy Smith stayed by the wheel all the time and made a careful chart of the stream, giving in detail the location of every apparent and every suspected obstruction. On the return trip he will use these memoranda as a guide and will note the appearance of other obstructions. In this way it may be possible to shorten the time in which the trip can be made.

It is 49 miles from Columbia to the Santee, and this part of the trip was made easily, for having bucked the 15 {?} foot rise in the Santee the skipper found that the current of the Congaree had been checked by the high water in the larger stream.

An Exploring Expedition.
“From the way they tried to discourage us in Georgetown, said Capt. Smith, “one would have thought that there was a stick of dynamite at every turn of the river, but we got through all right. We are on what is virtually an exploring expedition, and had to keep a sharp lookout for snags. I don’t know yet where the best water is and can shorten the trip when I learn the river a little better.” He has been a boat captain on the St. John’s and St. Mary’s rivers in Florida and the Cape Fear and Northeast rivers in North Carolina, and has the air of a man of rare intelligence upon matters of river navigation.

There was but a small cargo aboard, the first people to receive consignments of groceries being Messrs. J. B. Friday and J. B. Gallant, who have aboard a shipment of molasses, and Mr. L. B. Dozier gets a consignment of fixtures for gas pipes. The Highlander will not return until a good consignment is aboard as the initial trip has been very expensive. The river was low yesterday, one foot and nine inches above the very lowest, and Mr. Love is gratified that the boat has made the trip with no mishap in such conditions.

The Highlander will be tied up at old Granby today, and Mr. Love will have the boat in readiness for inspection by visitors. It is not an ocean steamer, not a pretentious vessel, but it will answer every purpose required of it, and is quite a “find.” Columbia was able to get the use of this boat without making a purchase, for there are too many boats operating on the Cape Fear between Wilmington and Fayetteville. If this venture pays, a second boat will be arranged for. Mr. Love stated last night that all he asks is a reasonable amount of freight at a fair rate of toll.

The Boat’s Dimensions.
While essentially a freight boat, the Highlander will carry passengers and has berths for 37. There are two nice staterooms for passengers in addition to the officers’ quarters and there is also the ladies’ cabin with berths and the gentlemen’s cabin with a number of cozy bunks. The Highlander is 135 feet long over all, 100 feet at the water line, and 23 feet wide on the beam. The wheel and the machinery are in the stern. Capt. Smith makes the assertion that a side wheeler like the Clark would be almost useless on the river. The Highlander draws 23 inches and loaded to its full capacity of 123 tons will draw but 3 1-2 feet. The tonnage is equivalent to the capacity of six box cars, and with two trips a week, as it is expected the regular schedule will afford, the Highlander should do a lot of hauling between Columbia and the coast, the consignments being transferred to ocean going vessels at Georgetown.

When the Columbia party got aboard the mate by request gave three long pulls at the whistle, and the deep, musical notes reverberated over the forest telling the city of Columbia that at 8.30 p. m., on the night of the 20th of March, 1904, she had become an “inland port.”

[The State – Columbia, SC – March 21, 1904]

 

THE HIGHLANDER AT COLUMBIA.
—–
Captain J. C. Smith Wakes Up
the Palmetto Capital.
—–
The Columbia (S. C.) State contains nearly two columns of compact matter describing the government work on the Congaree river and the advent at that city of our old acquaintance, the Highlander, in command of our former townsman, the veteran river navigator, Captain James C. Smith. The closing part of the article will be found very interesting to our people, and is as follows:
While examining the work on the dams the party from Columbia observed a light far off down the river. The watchman declared this to be fishermen out on the stream, but presently there was a noise unmistakably that of a steamer, and for an hour the lights were watched eagerly as they ##### closer to the city. First there was one tiny speck, then two, and finally the signal light was seen clearly, and then the outline of the boat from bow to stern. The Highlander stopped several hundred yards down the river from the dam and tied up at the landing at old Granby—one of the forgotten towns of South Carolina, a place once populous, now as deserted as is Hamburg, once Augusta’s competitor.

As there is a broad creek between the government works and the old Granby landing the visitors from the city engaged the services of a boatman and went down the river in a skiff to be the first to board the boat of which so much is expected in behalf of Columbia’s upbuilding.

THE HIGHLANDER A NEW BOAT.
The Highlander is a new boat, built in November, 1901, and every day that she has been in service she has been handled by the veteran river master, Capt. Jas. C. Smith, who has seen 32 years’ service on inland waterways, and yet is willing to admit that he does not know all about river channels. However, his successful trip with the Highlander adds to his fame as a river captain, and he has brought the boat through in great shape. It is over a month since the steamer left Wilmington, having been tied up at Southport for nearly three weeks waiting for the Atlantic ocean to offer a favorable opportunity for the run down the coast to Georgetown. With Capt. Smith are the following officers of the crew: LeRoy Smith, mate; James Peeples, chief mate and F. T. Gaskill, ship carpenter. Mr. Gaskill is the builder of the boat, and Capt. Smith declares it to be the sturdiest river craft he has ever managed in his 32 years of navigation. The hull is four inches in thickness and will stand a lot of hard knocks.

Henry Izard, a colored pilot, came with the boat and showed the way to Columbia, for he had made the trip before, with government tugs. Mr. LeRoy Smith stayed by the wheel all the time and made a careful chart of the stream, giving in detail the location of every apparent and every suspected obstruction. On the return trip he will use these memoranda as a guide and will note the appearance of other obstructions. In this way it may be possible to shorten the time in which the trip can be made.

It is 49 miles from Columbia to the Santee, and this part of the trip is made easily, for having bucked the 15 foot rise in the Santee the skipper found that the current of the Congaree had been checked by the high water in the larger stream.

AN EXPLORING EXPEDITION.
“From the way they tried to discourage one in Georgetown,” said Captain Smith, “one would have thought that there was a stick of dynamite at every turn of the river, but we got through all right. We are on what is virtually an exploring expedition, and had to keep a sharp lookout for snags. I don’t know yet where the best water is and can shorten the trip when I learn the river a little better.” He has been a boat captain on the St. John’s and St. Mary’s rivers in Florida and the Cape Fear and Northeast rivers in North Carolina, and has the air of a man of rare intelligence upon matters of river navigation.

There was but a small cargo aboard, the first people to receive consignments of groceries being Messrs. J. B. Friday and J. B. Gallant, who have aboard a shipment of molasses, and Mr. L. B. Dozier gets a consignment of fixtures for gas pipes. The Highlander will not return until a good consignment is aboard, as the initial trip has been very expensive. The river was low yesterday, one foot and nine inches above the very lowest, and Mr. Love is gratified that the boat has made the trip with no mishap in such conditions.

The Highlander will be tied up at old Granby today, and Mr. Love will have the boat in readiness for inspection by visitors. It is not an ocean steamer, not a pretentious vessel, but it will answer every purpose required of it, and it quite a “find.” Columbia was able to get the use of this boat without making a purchase, for there are too many boats operating on the Cape Fear between Wilmington and Fayetteville. If this venture pays, a second boat will be arranged for. Mr. Love stated last night that all he asks is a reasonable amount of freight at a fair rate of toll.

THE BOAT’S DIMENSIONS.
While essentially a freight boat, the Highlander will carry passengers and has berths for 37. There are two nice staterooms for passengers in addition to the officers’ quarters and there is also the ladies’ cabin with berths and the gentlemen’s cabin with a number of cozy bunks. The Highlander is 136 feet long over all, 100 feet at the waterline, and 23 feet wide on the beam. The wheel and the machinery are in the stern. Capt. Smith makes the assertion that a side wheeler like the Clark would be almost useless on the river. The Highlander draws 23 inches and loaded to its full capacity of 123 tons will draw but 3½ feet. The tonnage is equivalent to the capacity of six box cars, and with two trips a week, as it is expected the regular schedule will afford, the Highlander should do a lot of hauling between Columbia and the coast, the consignments being transferred to ocean going vessels at Georgetown.

When the Columbia party got aboard the mate by request gave three long pulls at the whistle, and the deep, musical notes reverberated over the forest telling the city of Columbia that at 8:30 p. m. on the nigh of the 20th of March, 1904, she had become an “inland port.”

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, April 7, 1904]

 

HIGHLANDER’S TRIP
WAS LESS THAN A DAY.
——-
From Columbia to Georgetown in
Twenty-three Hours.
——-
FREIGHT IS BEING SOLICITED
——-
Satisfactory Through Traffic Arrangements
With the Clyde Line Have Been Made.
——-

The Highlander, the first boat to run on the Congaree, made its first trip to Georgetown in 23 hours, without a mishap or a delay, arriving in Georgetown Thursday morning. It will not be known until today just what day the boat will leave Georgetown on its return trip. It will bring back an assorted cargo.

A telegram received last night bore the cheerful information that an agreement had been reached for the thorough traffic arrangements with the Clyde line. Manager Love, who returned to Columbia yesterday from a trip to New York, Wilmington, Georgetown and other points, is now soliciting freight shipments among the merchants here.

Capt. Tamplett is accomplishing good work with the government snag boat on the Congaree and hopes to have the river entirely free of obstructions in the near future. He has removed half the longs on Congaree shoal, where the Highlander struck trouble and bottom on the occasion of its first trip down the river and is fighting the remainder gallantly.

The navigation committee of the Chamber of Commerce meets at noon today. The directors’ meeting will be held on Monday.

[The State – Columbia, SC – April 09, 1904]

 

REGULAR SCHEDULE
FOR “HIGHLANDER.”
——-
To Be Here Sundays and in
Georgetown Wednesdays.
——-
MEETS CLYDE STEAMERS WEEKLY
——-
Schedule of Rates Adopted – To Build
Warehouse and Establish Dray
Line – Excursions This Week.
——-

Important business was transacted at the meeting yesterday of the navigation committee of the Chamber of Commerce. A regular schedule for the Highlander’s runs between here and Georgetown was fixed so as to have the Columbia boat meet the Clyde line’s New York steamers there on Wednesdays and exchange cargoes with them, and the rates of freight were agreed upon in practically every detail. Those merchants desiring to use the line are asked to send to the Chamber of Commerce for a copy of the rate schedule.

The Highlander, which is now at Georgetown, will leave that port tomorrow, arriving here Wednesday night with a cargo of molasses and canned goods.

The boat will put in the remainder of this week here, making daily excursions down the river.

On Monday week the operation of the regular schedule begins. This will be: Leave Columbia Mondays at noon, arrive at Georgetown Wednesdays at noon; leave Georgetown Thursday 5 a. m., arrive Columbia Saturday nights and lay over here Sundays.

The committee made arrangements looking to the erection of a terminal warehouse at the old Granby landing and the establishment of a dray line from the warehouse to the doors of the Columbia mercantile houses. This method will be used until the completion of the government dam and the establishment of the Gervais street landing, when another warehouse will be built, another dray line established and more boats put on the river.

Clyde line steamers leave New York Saturdays and arrive Georgetown Wednesdays, and the Highlander’s schedule was blocked out to fit into the Clyde line’s schedule. The Highlander will carry out a cargo of cotton goods from Columbia Monday week.

The Highlander will make stops at the regular landings along the river going and coming, and it is expected that a fine local freight business will be done at once and that this will rapidly increase.

[The State – Columbia, SC – April 10, 1904]

 

THE BOAT SUBSIDY
TO BE INCREASED.
——-
“Highlander” is Not Getting
Enough Outgoing Freight.
——-
THE MERCHANTS ASKED TO HELP
——-
The Regular Trips of the Boat Commenced
Two Months Ago and Results Are Fairly Satisfactory.
——-

There was a numerously attended and an enthusiastic joint meeting last night of the river navigation committee of the Chamber of Commerce and subscribers to the Highlander’s subsidy fund. The meeting went over the situation in detail, receiving full reports from Manager Love as to the business done by the boat since it began its regular trips about 60 days ago.

These reports showed that while the business is steadily increasing it is still far short of what it should be and it was decided to ask for an increase of the subsidy. A majority of the Columbia merchants have already subscribed, but there are still many who have not.

The committee will at an early date personally see these merchants whose names are not on the list, and in addition will ask subscriptions from other classes of business men. The boat needs more outgoing business. She could also haul more incoming freight, and plenty of this could be obtained if the merchants would take the precaution to instruct shipment via the Clyde line in care of the Highlander.

The inability of the Highlander to secure business enough to meet expenses is due in a large measure, however, to the generally slack season in the movements of freight.

[The State – Columbia, SC – June 11, 1904]

 

THE HIGHLANDER
TOTALLY DESTROYED.
——-
Burned Near Georgetown on
Downward Trip.
——-
THE TOTAL LOST OVER — $9,000
——-
Manager T. D. Love Received Telegram
Giving Information, but Furnishing
No Details – No Cargo Aboard.
——-
Manager T. D. Love of the Highlander was greatly surprised and profoundly shocked last night by a telegram which came to him at midnight from Capt. J. C. Smith saying the boat had been burned 25 miles above Georgetown. The telegram gave no particulars and nothing is known here as to the origin of the fire. The telegram was dated Georgetown and simply said “Highlander lost by fire 24 miles above Georgetown. Total loss.”

The boat was on its way to Georgetown at the time and had no cargo. The vessel was practically new, having been built only three years ago, and was valued at $12,000. It was insured for only $3,000, with J. H. Boatwright & Son at Wilmington, N. C. Although the telegram says “total loss,” Manager Love is of the opinion that much of the machinery may be saved. The loss falls heavily on Mr. Love – he and not the Chamber of Commerce being the owner.

The Highlander was the first and only boat on the line the Chamber of Commerce instituted this spring to give Columbia water connection with the coast. The business has steadily increased since the first trips and arrangements had just been made for hauling cotton, which would greatly relieve the situation and for which the Chamber of Commerce had been working for several months.

Just what steps will be taken to put another boat in commission on the river cannot be said at this time, but there is no doubt but that this will be done as quickly as the Chamber of Commerce can make the arrangements.

[The State – Columbia, SC – June 17, 1904]

 

GOES UP IN FLAMES.
—–
Steamer Highlander Destroyed by
Fire Last Thursday Morning.
No Lives Lost.
—–
Last Thersday {misspelled} morning about 9 0’clock, the Steamer Highlander which runs from this port to Columbia, was totally destroyed by fire on the Santee River, near Fawn Hill landing. The boat was a total wreck in thirty minutes after the fire started. Fawn Hill is about 25 miles from this city.
An OUTLOOK man interviewed Capt. J. R. S. Sian, who was making a trip with the boat, in regard to the accident. He said no one knew how the fire originated. One of the deck hands first saw the fire and gave the alarm.
“Both Capt. Smith and myself,” said Capt. Sian, “were sick and lying down when the alarm was given. Buckets of water were thrown on the blaze and in a few minutes the pumps were started, but the boat burned like tinder, having a strong head wind, and in thirty minutes she was completely destroyed. The fire was first seen over the boiler.”
In getting out Capt. Sian lost a gold watch and a rifle. Capt. Smith lost about $300 in personal effects. Capt. J. C. Smith, Capt. J. R. S. Sian, Mate Leroy Smith, Pilot Henry Izard and eight deck hands were on board. All escaped without injury.
As soon as it was found that the boat could not be saved, she was ran ashore and the crew jumped off. Capt. Sian said that the negroes were completely panic stricken and could not get them to do anything at all. The Highlander only had a very light load of freight. She was valued at $12,000 and had $3,000 insurance. Capt. Smith hired a cart and brought the crew to the city. They got in about 9 o’clock Thursday night.
Mr. E. C. Haselden had about $100 worth of goods lost on the boat. Information from Columbia advised us that another boat will be secured and put on from Columbia to Georgetown.

[The Sunday Outlook – Georgetown, SC – June 18, 1904]

 

TO PUT ANOTHER
BOAT ON RIVER
——-
Committee Takes Steps to at Once
Replace Highlander.
——-
MERCHANTS THOROUGHLY AROUSED
——-
To Importance of the Matter As Shown
By Recent Rapid Growth of
Boat’s Business.
——-

At a meeting yesterday to consider the situation brought about by the burning of the Highlander, the river navigation committee of the Chamber of Commerce took steps to replace at once the Highlander with a boat of equal carrying capacity, though the new boat will likely not be so costly as the ill-fated Highlander. Manager T. D. Love will probably own and operate the new boat. The committee will not buy a boat unless it is necessary, preferring the boat to be owned by its operator.

Since the Columbia newspapers have stirred up the local merchants to the importance of patronizing the line the business has grown by leaps and bounds the past few weeks. So much so that Secretary Clark said last night that probably three or four boats could be operated on the river at a profit in a short time. At the meeting yesterday the whole situation regarding river navigation was gone over and thoroughly discussed, and it was clearly shown by the experience of the Highlander that the river is comfortably navigable at lowest water, and that the boat can be operated at a profit as well as result in a great indirect saving to the merchants. Especially is this true since the necessary arrangements as to insurance have been made for the shipment of cotton goods on the boat.

The committee yesterday sent telegrams to Charleston, Savannah and other port towns making inquiries for another boat, which will be put on the river as soon as it can be purchased. The committee determined to lose no more time than is necessary. Among the shipments now waiting at the Georgetown docks for the line are: 506,000 pounds of starch, 2,000 cases of tomatoes, 20 barrels of lead traps, five crates of earthenware and 200 barrels of molasses. Much more is on the way.

Members of the committee thought the Clyde line people might be induced to put a boat on the river, but those who know something of this company’s relations with the railroads were of the opinion that the Clyde line concern would not be enthusiastic about such a proposition. However, it will be made; correspondence has already begun to that end.
The mill people have made a proposition to the Chamber of Commerce to finish the Washington A. Clark, on which $18,000 has already been expended. The mill people are willing to put $7,000 more into the boat if Columbia will put in $20,000, but it is thought this scheme will not be feasible, insasmuch as the town is hardly prepared to spend so much just now on a boat, and because it is thought the Washington A. Clark being a sidewheeler will not be able to get through the docks.

The only particulars obtainable yesterday about the burning of the Highlander came in a special to The State from its Georgetown correspondent:
“The steamer Highlander was destroyed by fire on the Santee river this afternoon at or near Fawn Hill, about 25 miles by water from Georgetown. The captain and crew arrived here at night by private conveyance too late to telegraph the news. They report the steamer a total wreck. Nothing was saved.

“The fire originated from a spark catching the lightwood on deck and the efforts of the crew to extinguish the flames proving unavailing, the boat was run ashore and the crew gotten ashore safely.”

[The State – Columbia, SC – June 18, 1904]

 

WANT TO REBUILD
THE HIGHLANDER
——-
Until That Is Done New Boat
Will be Leased for Line.
——-
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AT WORK
——-
Moving Energetically to Restore Boat
Transportation With as Little
Delay as Possible.
——-
The Chamber of Commerce is still zealously and energetically at work to secure another boat to take the place of the recently burned Highlander, but as yet there are no definite results, although there are hopeful signs that satisfactory arrangements will be made in the next few days. Correspondence has been opened with the view to the transfer to the Congaree line of a boat from a Cooper river line or from one of the lines running out of Savannah, Georgetown or Wilmington. It is thought that one of these boats can be secured. If so it will be leased by Manager Love to do the business of the line until Mr. Love can get the Highlander rebuilt.

Just how much salvage there will be in the sunken Highlander’s hull cannot be said until the boat is raised, but it is confidently hoped that the most valuable parts of it, the machinery, are yet in good condition. The work of raising and rebuilding the Highlander, if this turns out to be practicable, will begin as soon as Mr. Love gets his insurance adjusted, which he hopes to do now in a few days.

If all efforts fail to get a boat from one of the nearby river lines, arrangements will be made to buy a small boat of good drawing capacity and haul the freight with a barge attached until more satisfactory arrangements can be perfected.

It is understood the government boat now on the river here will be sold at an early date and the Chamber of Commerce has its eye on this. The boat will answer the purposes of the barge scheme admirably, it is thought. It goes through the locks against current with heavily loaded lighters with graceful ease.
The Chamber of Commerce is fully determined that the new river line shall be without a boat no longer than is absolutely necessary.

[The State – Columbia, SC – June 21, 1904]

 

Steamer Highlander.
The Wilmington Dispatch of Friday evening says:
The burning of the steamer Highlander, near Georgetown, S. C., will be much regretted here by the scores of friends of Mr. T. D. Love, of Wilmington, the owner. The steamer, formerly one of the Cape Fear fleet, was running between Columbia and Georgetown and was doing a nice business. With the spirit of the people of Columbia and the energy of Mr. Love it may be safely depended on that it will not be long before another steamer will take the Highlander’s place.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, June 23, 1904]

To Rebuild the Highlander.
The stockholders of the Merchants and Farmers’ steamboat Company held a meeting in Wilmington yesterday, with Mr. Oliver Evans, of this city, presiding, and decided to rebuild the Highlander, which was recently destroyed between Georgetown and Columbia, S. C. Bids for the purchase of the machinery of the burned steamer “Highlander” were received and opened, but none of them was considered satisfactory. The stockholders decided to recover the machinery from the river near Georgetown, S. C., for themselves and to rebuild the boat as early as practicable. The machinery will be brought to Wilmington and the boat will be rebuilt there.

[Fayetteville Observer – Thursday, July 21, 1904]

The “City of Fayetteville.”
The steamer City of Fayetteville, which has been tied up in Wilmington for a month or two having her boilers replaced by those of the old Highlander, which were recently recovered from the river near Georgetown, S. C., where the steamer burned, will be put in commission again this week. It is understood that Mr. S. P. McNair will have charge of the affairs of the steamer at this end of the line. The old boilers in the boat were too expensive to steam for the river operation. A number of other improvements have also been made to the “Fayetteville.”

[Wilmington Star – October 14, 1906]

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 11, 2014 in Uncategorized